The Mini Countryman is neither small nor a man of the country, but it is a popular and premium small crossover. What do you need to know before you buy a Mini Countryman? Don’t worry, we’ll tell you everything right here in the Ultimate Buyer’s Guide.

We’re a little verklempt over the Mini Countryman. On one hand, it actually isn’t that big and it does offer a nicer and more luxurious package than a lot of cars in this class. When kitted out with the S or JCW package it’s also not slow.

A lot of people don’t love the aesthetics, but it’s at least unique. The question is: Are you’re willing to pay nearly $30,000 for the Cooper S All4 package when you could get a nicely equipped AWD model from almost any other automaker?

If you’re all about touch-and-feel and you want a Mini you can’t go wrong with a Countryman, but for the price we’d be open to other options.

What’s New About The 2015 Mini Countryman:

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The Countryman arrived on our shores for the 2011 model year and has received some small updates since then. 2012 brought a standard rear bench to replace that weird center rail, 2013 brought the sporty John Cooper Works trim, 2015 brought some minor changes to the Countryman like a new grille, new color options, and new wheels. This year’s 2016 model brings a new Park Lane package, but not much else, as a new Countryman based on the latest Mini platform is expected to arrive soon.

Powertrain Breakdown

Mini offers three versions of a 1.6L inline four. There’s the base 1.6L, available only on Cooper trim, which puts out 121 HP. The turbo version, available on the Cooper S and Cooper S All4, tacks on another 60 ponies. Finally, the most potent mill, the John Cooper Works turbo I4, which cranks out 208 horses and 192 torques.

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2016 Mini Countryman Engine Options

EngineHorsepower (hp)Torque (lb-ft)
1.6L I4
121 @ 6000 rpm
114 @ 4250 rpm
1.6L Turbo I4
181 @ 5500 rpm
177 @ 1600
1.6L Turbo I4 (tuned)208 @ 6000 rpm192 @ 1900

Fuel Economy Breakdown

Fuel economy is competitive for the segment with the base Cooper and the Cooper S scoring about the same on the EPA’s fuel economy cycles. The John Cooper Works countryman loses a couple of combined MPG compared to the others, but it’s the more powerful performance engine, so that’s no surprise. All Countrymans manage 30 MPG or more on the highway.

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2016 Mini Countryman Fuel Economy Ratings (City/Highway/Combined)

1.6L I41.6L I4 Turbo1.6L I4 Turbo (tuned)
Fuel Economy- Manual
27/32/29 [2wd]
26/32/29 [2wd]
25/31/27 [awd]
25/31/27 [awd]
Fuel Economy- Auto
25/30/27 [2wd]
25/32/28 [2wd]
23/30/26 [awd]
23/30/26 [awd]

Trim Level Breakdown

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All Countrymans come with a MacPherson Strut front suspension, Multi-Link rear setup, and electric power steering. Front discs are ventilated 11.6 inches on the Cooper and 12.4 inches on the S models and JCW model. Rear discs are 11 inches in diameter and solid.

Countrymans come in four trims: Cooper, Cooper S, Cooper S All4, and John Cooper Works All4.

  • Cooper: Base model. Starts at $22,750. Notable standard features: 1.6-liter naturally aspirated I4, 6-speed Getrag manual transmission, 17” aluminum wheels, base leatherette seats, 7 airbags, push button start, keyless entry, power windows, 6-speaker stereo with HD radio and Bluetooth capability, heated mirrors, rain sensing wipers, auto lights, roof rails. Notable options: MINI Park Lane Edition: unique gray paint, red striping, red roof and mirrors, unique exterior trim, 18” dark gray aluminum wheels ($2,500); Cold Weather Package: heated front seats, auto dimming power folding mirrors; Sport Package: upgraded wheels, sport seats, white turn signals ($1,250); Premium Package: panoramic sunroof, Harman Kardon Sound System, proximity keyless entry ($1,800); Media Package: MINI Connected iPhone integration, 6.5” touchscreen, enhanced Bluetooth, center armrest with mobile docking, voice command ($750); Navigation Package: MINI connected iPhone integration, enhanced Bluetooth, center armrest with mobile docking, navigation system ($1,500); JCW Exterior Package: 18” alloy wheels, power folding mirrors, Piano black exterior, white hood stripes, white turn signals ($1,250); JCW interior package: JCW leather steering wheel, sport seats, JCW interior accents, piano black dash surface, unique headliner, dynamic traction control ($1,000); Fully Loaded package: Mini Connected with Navigation Package, Premium Package, Sport Package, Rear Park Distance Control, parking sensors, auto dimming power folding mirrors ($4,750); Sport suspension ($500).
  • Cooper S: Starts at $26,100. Notable standard features over Cooper: 1.6-liter turbo I4, air scoop, bigger brakes with brake ducts, sports seats, black tailpipe, dual exhaust, Notable options: Mini Park Lane Edition ($2,500); Cold Weather Package: same as Cooper ($2,500); Sport Package: updated wheels, xenon headlights, white turn signals ($1,000); Premium Package: same as Cooper ($1,800); Media Package: Same as Cooper ($750); Navigation Package: Same as Cooper ($1,500); Fully Loaded Package: same as cooper ($4,500); JCW exterior package: unique wheels, aero kit and exterior trim ($3,250); JCW Interior Package: same as Cooper ($500); Sport Suspension ($500).
  • Cooper S All4: Starts at $27,850. Notable standard features over Cooper S: all-wheel drive. Other features and options are the same as Cooper S.
  • John Cooper Works All4: Starts at $35,350. Notable standard features over Cooper S All4: Tuned higher horsepower 1.6-liter turbo I4, JCW tuned sport suspension, 18” wheels, unique steering wheel and JCW interior trim, sport dual exhaust, JCW aero kit. Notable options: Cold Weather Package: Same as Cooper ($750); Premium Package: same as Cooper ($1,800); Media Package: Same as Cooper ($750); Navigation Package: Same as Cooper ($750); Fully Loaded Package: Same as Cooper ($4000).

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Which One We’d Buy

Realistically, if you’re buying a Mini Countryman you probably don’t need the ALL4 AWD system, so your smart money is on a Cooper S, which comes with a lot of options standard and is the best looking of the bunch. Since we’re going premium, we’d step up to the $1,000 sport package and throw in the $500 Copper Metallic paint. Look at it. You’re starting to like the Countryman now, aren’t you? With the $850 fee that puts you at $29,700, but you can save $1,250 if you opt for the manual over the six-speed automatic with paddle shifters. [Build Your Own]

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Important Facts At A Glance:

MSRP: $22,750-$35,350 Max Advertised Towing Capability: Not Recommended

MPG: 27 city/ 34 hwy / 30 combined [2wd manual 1.6L I4] Engines: 1.6L I4, 1.6L I4 turbo

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Curb Weight: ~2,950-3,300 pounds IIHS Rating: NA

Transmissions: 6-speed manual, 6-speed Automatic

Drivetrain Layout: Front engine, FWD/4WD

Photo credit: Mini

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