Massachusetts Follows California, Bans Sale Of New Gas-Powered Cars By 2035

Illustration for article titled Massachusetts Follows California, Bans Sale Of New Gas-Powered Cars By 2035
Photo: Sean Gallup (Getty Images)

Another state has followed California’s example in banning the sale of new gasoline-powered vehicles. This time, it’s Massachusetts, and it’s aiming for a more electric-friendly state by 2035.

This is all part of a larger plan released by Governor Charlie Baker. In it, Massachusetts has committed to becoming completely carbon neutral by 2050. According to research provided in the plan, 27 percent of statewide emissions come from passenger vehicles—which isn’t a lot, but again, this is just one facet of a much larger plan.

Other goals laid out by the plan include:

  • Robust public transportation options, including wider sidewalks and bike lanes
  • Robust network of charging infrastructure
  • More energy efficient buildings designed with high-performance heat pumps
  • Transition to more organic waste materials

The study also includes a lot of research to remind you that, actually, opting for a more carbon neutral world will have benefits, including:

  • Avoiding 27 cardiovascular or respiratory deaths enhanced by greenhouse gasses
  • Preventing 1,700 days of missed work
  • Adding 4,000 jobs to support the electric charging infrastructure

California and New Jersey have also proposed plans to achieve a similar goal, and it’s very likely we’ll see more states doing so in the near future. President-Elect Joe Biden has expressed his interest in electrification and environmentally-friendly transportation, which means states could see federal support for their initiatives.

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While EV production is still minute compared to the entirety of all cars produced, this kind of carbon neutral push could actually force the hands of automakers to ramp up production.

That said, these laws only focus on the sale of new vehicles. If you live in Massachusetts or California, you can still get your internal combustion fix by buying used.

Weekends at Jalopnik. Managing editor at A Girl's Guide to Cars. Lead IndyCar writer and assistant editor at Frontstretch. Novelist. Motorsport fanatic.

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DISCUSSION

So nobody makes a viable electric car yet (assuming you won’t be able to rent a gasoline powered car for long trips), charging infrastructure basically doesn’t exist outside of major cities, power plants can barely keep up with current demand, and the raw materials for sufficient batteries may not exist at all.

Sure, we’re totally going to be ready for 100% electric cars in fifteen years.