Hyundai Gave Its Concept Car a Bunch of Features You Can't Buy Yet

Illustration for article titled Hyundai Gave Its Concept Car a Bunch of Features You Can't Buy Yet
Image: Hyundai

Credit where credit is due, Hyundai has been making a lot of great cars lately, and the company’s sales growth reflects that. Hyundai wants you to know that it can think about the future, too. With the Le Fil Rouge concept unveiled last year, Hyundai has a vision of the connected, integrated, self-parking future that it represents. All of this is shown in a new video from the company’s YouTube channel.

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Aside from being a striking car, the Le Fil Rouge concept has a lot of tech built in. Hyundai have taken the concept car and digitized it to show off its new ideas. None of this actually exists yet outside of this digital creation, so don’t get your hopes too high just yet.

Hyundai wants you to control your all-electric Le Fil Rouge’s actions with a touch of your smart device. Once you arrive to work or to the shopping mall or whatever location, this fantasy world allows you to tap and your car “finds the charging stations through the communication between the vehicle and the building”. Then the car will just drive off to park itself on an inductive charging platform, similar to the Qi charger you may put your iTelephone on at night, but way bigger.

Firstly, this kind of self-park tech would rely on a large network of interconnected buildings and future cars. I don’t know if Hyundai plans to offer all of this tech on a shared basis with other car manufacturers, or it just hopes that by the time this is all feasible Hyundai will have 100% market share, but either way, it seems like a pipe dream. We can’t even agree on a common charging cord design for the dozens of mobile devices we need these days.

By the looks of things in the video, even Hyundai admits that having every parking space in a lot with induction charging would be too expensive, so they “developed” an idea to move the now-charged electric car to a standard parking spot to free up the charger for the next EV to come in for a charge. All of this allegedly happens automatically, and without human interaction.

While there are dozens of companies working on inductive charging mats for cars, and I do believe that will become a reality in the near term, it seems unlikely that we’ll see it adopted on a public basis for shopping centers and parking structures for several decades. Hell, I’ve been to a lot of parking garages that still don’t take credit cards.

This is not meant as a knock against Hyundai Motor Group, but the video here seems a bit meaningless. It feels more of a “check out some of our incredible thoughts” than a preview of coming attractions.

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H/T: Autoblog

Jalopnik contributor with a love for everything sketchy and eclectic.

DISCUSSION

soundman98
soundman98

Hyundai wants you to control your all-electric Le Fil Rouge’s actions with a touch of your smart device. Once you arrive to work or to the shopping mall or whatever location, this fantasy world allows you to tap and your car “finds the charging stations through the communication between the vehicle and the building”. Then the car will just drive off to park itself on an inductive charging platform, similar to the Qi charger you may put your iTelephone on at night, but way bigger.

Firstly, this kind of self-park tech would rely on a large network of interconnected buildings and future cars. I don’t know if Hyundai plans to offer all of this tech on a shared basis with other car manufacturers, or it just hopes that by the time this is all feasible Hyundai will have 100% market share, but either way, it seems like a pipe dream. We can’t even agree on a common charging cord design for the dozens of mobile devices we need these days.

i wish companies would stop with this crap. besides the disagreement about car charging standards(everyone else agreed to an SAE spec, and then tesla fucked it up with their own ‘better’ version), we can’t even agree on the whole ‘interconnected cars’ data thing where all cars are supposed to talk to each other about traffic incidents. and that was a concept idea back in the 80's.

By the looks of things in the video, even Hyundai admits that having every parking space in a lot with induction charging would be too expensive, so they “developed” an idea to move the now-charged electric car to a standard parking spot to free up the charger for the next EV to come in for a charge. All of this allegedly happens automatically, and without human interaction.

While there are dozens of companies working on inductive charging mats for cars, and I do believe that will become a reality in the near term, it seems unlikely that we’ll see it adopted on a public basis for shopping centers and parking structures for several decades. Hell, I’ve been to a lot of parking garages that still don’t take credit cards

as someone who has worked on electrical panels in parking garages, inductive charging is a hilarious pipe dream with existing buildings.

most plug-in, level 2 chargers are around 30-60A each depending on the charger. most parking garage’s have 1 or two 100A panels distributed around the garage specifically for lights, and a couple 120v outlets. with all the led conversion stuff that most have already done, that leaves some capacity in those panels for 1 60A charger, or maybe 2 30A chargers.

for those unfamiliar, everything in parking garages is run in the concrete. this means that to fulfill hyundai’s pipe dream, the entire parking garage would need to be gutted, the concrete sawed open throughout the garage, and absolutely everything from the utility connection would need to be replaced with much larger variants. it would also be likely that the utility company would need to upgrade their transformer for the increased load. in some area’s, they bill the customer for this.

it would be cheaper to knock the entire parking garage down and start over.

and as OEM’s have clearly established in the past, they have zero interest in doing infrastructure changes to support the vehicles they make. they have chosen to define themselves as car manufacturers, not infrastructure adapters.

it’s what i find so irritating about concepts like this. it’s not even theoretically possible given the constraints of reality and how these OEM’s have chosen to define themselves, no matter what time frame we put on it.