Elon’s Right, It’s Good That The Cybertruck Doesn't Make Sense

Everyone, Brace Yourselves, I'm About To Say Something Nice About Elon Musk

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Image: Tesla

Earlier today, Tesla CEO Elon Musk tweeted something, that, to my surprise, I actually like. Now, I realize I’ve been critical of Musk and the dumb things he has tweeted before, but this time there’s a core concept in this tweet that I heartily approve of. This doesn’t happen too often, so I figure it’s worth noting when it does.

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Here’s the tweet in question, in a response to a response to an article predicting the Cybertruck, whenever it finally comes out, will flop:

Now, it’s not the Cybertruck itself I’m defending here; I personally feel it’s a deeply stupid design, ill-suited for actual, real-world truck use, and every new thing I hear about it just makes me more convinced, like this other Elon tweet talking about how it will forego door handles:

Having systems in the truck to recognize you and automatically open doors is, I think, a waste of resources and hardware. Door handles work fine! This is a silly party trick that will inevitably bite you on the ass when it goes wrong.

Maybe if it was for a cargo door on a van where you’re likely to have your arms full, like the foot-wave tailgates that many modern SUVs have, but this is just showy bullshit.

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Also, the Cybertruck design looks like something Curtis Brubaker did way back in 1978:

Image for article titled Elon’s Right, It’s Good That The Cybertruck Doesn't Make Sense
Image: Tesla/Curtis Brubaker/Penthouse
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Okay, sorry, I know you’re not here to have to endure with me shitting on the Cybertruck—a vehicle that, for what it’s worth, I don’t necessarily think will flop. And, it’s worth mentioning that in the field of full-size trucks, it’s not like they’re not also overgrown, miserably ugly things—I mean, look at the Chevy Silverado HD:

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Image: Chevrolet
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That’s a fucking monster right there. It’s awful. That whole segment is a disaster of colossal, ugly, ridiculous machines.

What I like about what Elon said is this part:

....there is always some chance that Cybertruck will flop, because it is so unlike anything else. I don’t care. I love it so much even if others don’t.

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What I like about this is that he, and by extension, Tesla is willing to make something dramatically different from the norm and take the risk. It’s something I wish more automakers would do.

Because, he’s right that trucks—and, really, most SUVs, crossovers, cars, everything—do tend to end up looking the same. This isn’t a new phenomenon—cars from every decade tend to converge on a particular sort of generalized design of the era, for a large number of reasons ranging from the styling trends of the era, manufacturing advancements, aerodynamic understanding, and so on.

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But those rare cars where someone decides to try something new are the ones we really remember. The Chevrolet Corvair, for example, stood out technically—with its rear-engine design—and stylistically when it arrived in the late 1950s, but ended up defining the style of the decade to come.

People remember the VW Beetle because it was designed like a car of the 1930s all the way to 2003, so it stood out. We remember supercars that break all the rules because they’re for people rich enough to not give a shit, and we remember oddball designs like the Gremlin or Pacer because AMC was always too desperate and broke to give a shit.

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The point is, it’s good to have unexpected, unusual car designs out in the world. I don’t have any desire for a Cybertruck, but I want to see them out on the road, mixing it up in traffic, making our carscape more varied.

I hope enough Cybertrucks sell so that other manufacturers become emboldened enough to try designing strange, unexpected vehicles that might be more to my tastes.

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Image: Tesla/Canoo

If the Cybertruck takes off, that means that other oddball trucks like Canoo’s reborn VW Type 2 pickup-style truck or Bollinger’s boxy, utilitarian vehicles might have a chance, too.

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The more variety, the better. I’d love to see all sorts of bonkers ideas on the roads, and I want to see things that I love and things that I just can’t stand, because that means you’re alive, not suspended in the monochrome miasma of crossovers and SUVs and hulking pickups that choke our roads today.

To get there, though, automakers need to take the passionate approach Elon is taking to his big, awkward, sharp-cornered Cybertruck: it’s enough that he loves it, so they’re going to build it.

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Carmakers can ignore the focus groups for at least one daring thing in their lineups, can’t they? Sure they can.

Listen to Elon. Emulate his love of that stupid truck, and we’ll all be better for it.

DISCUSSION

By
illrigger

It’s funny that you are so attached to door handles, when car designers don’t even include them or side mirrors in their designs - engineers add them later. Door handles are unnecessary in today’s cars and interfere with aerodynamics. Ford got rid of them on the Mach-E, Hyundai is hiding them inside the door itself until you get next to the car on the Ioniq 5, and you can bet that more and more cars will be getting the same treatment in an effort to get a couple extra miles per charge from vehicles. Next will go the side mirrors, replaced with wide angle cameras that eliminate blind spots entirely.

I will now open the floor for the arguments about “how mirrors and door handles don’t fail like electronic components do”, with the reminder of how many times in your life you have had a cracked or broken side mirror, or how many times you have seen a car with a door handle made useless because someone took a screwdriver to the lock to break in, vs how many times you have seen a stock backup camera stop working or times the power door locks from your keyfob have failed to work (discounting the times you forgot to change the battery in the fob). In the end, things that are inside your car are more reliable than things that stick out of them, simply because external forces aren’t as likely to break them.