Harley-Davidson has been parading it's LiveWire electric motorcycle around the country, giving riders a taste of what's coming next from H-D. But right now, it would cost $50,000 – twice what people would pay – and only delivering around 50 miles of range – half of what consumers want.

Harley's president and CEO, Matt Levatich, took to the stage at the Wisconsin Sustainable Business Council's annual conference this week to talk about the company first foray into electric bikes.

From the Journal Sentinel:

Levatich described the LiveWire project as being one piece of the Milwaukee motorcycle manufacturer's stepped-up focus in recent years on sustainability and reducing its environmental footprint.

At Harley, sustainability work in recent years has focused on reducing waste and emissions from factories and operations, but those represent just "a sliver" of the company's total environmental footprint, Levatich said.

Levatich went on to say that the LiveWire wouldn't go on sale until next-generation battery technology is available, and without the demonstration of the LiveWire, researchers at Samsung and Johnson Controls wouldn't include Harley in on the conversation about new lithium-ion chemistries.

That increased capacity is going to be key, because it will both bring down the costs and increase range.

Its range is 50 miles, but customers are looking for 100, Levatich said. If the electric bike were mass-produced today it would sell for about $50,000, about 50% more than customers would want to pay, he said.

We've spoke with people involved with the project earlier this year, and there was a consensus that a production version of the LiveWire would arrive next year. But if Levatich's comments are any indication, that's still a long ways off.