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Ducati's New All-Carbon Superleggera V4 Costs $285 Per Pound

Illustration for article titled Ducatis New All-Carbon Superleggera V4 Costs $285 Per Pound
Image: Ducati

Ducati unveiled Thursday afternoon the new benchmark for superbikes in the Superleggera V4. Based on Ducati’s Panigale V4, the Superleggera V4 throws all of that heavy aluminum in the trash and replaces it with giant swathes of lightweight carbon fiber. The entire load bearing structure—including frame, subframe, swingarm, and wheels—is crafted from CFRP. All of that carbon allows the Superleggera to lose a little over 35 pounds.

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Structural carbon, however, is incredibly expensive to manufacture. Ducati hasn’t yet confirmed what this limited-to-500-units bike will cost, but thanks to a leaked spec list, it’s expected to hit the market for a cool $100,000.

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Ducati calls this its most powerful and most technologically advanced motorcycle ever. When fitted with the optional titanium Akrapovic track-only exhaust, the 998cc V4 makes a staggering 234 horsepower. When this bike is converted to its track-only spec, it carries only 1.43 pounds per horsepower. This of course does not include the weight of a rider, naturally, but it’s still pretty impressive.

It’s also impressive that this bike will cost six figures.

Illustration for article titled Ducatis New All-Carbon Superleggera V4 Costs $285 Per Pound

That the bike is fast is a foregone conclusion, honestly, but Ducati’s test rider Alessandro Valia took the Superleggera V4 around Mugello (with the racing kit and slick tires) in 1 minute 52.45 seconds, which is just two seconds off Ducati’s Panigale V4 R SBK race bike.

Did I mention it’s a hundred grand?

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The bike’s aero package is inspired by recent Ducati MotoGP racers, and the street-legal biplane aerofoils produce 120 pounds of downforce at 170 mph. The downforce is helpful for keeping the front wheel down in acceleration, and increases the lightweight bike’s stability under braking.

That’s the kind of aero you get for a $100,000 price tag.

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What else does the Superleggera V4 have? A dry clutch, manually adjusted Desmodromic timing, eight configurable riding modes, a special “RaceGP” gauge display developed by Andrea Dovizioso, a new EVO 2 electronics package with Ducati Traction Control and Ducati Quick Shift, Brembo brakes, GP-derived Öhlins suspension, and an individually numbered ignition key.

You still start this bike with a goddamn key, and it costs $100,000.

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Ducati says that because these bikes are so complex to build, they can only make five of them per day. Deliveries will start in June 2020, and will be completed by the end of the year, but it might be quite a long wait for your allocation.

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And if you don’t feel like $100,000 is quite enough money to spend on a bike, Ducati will gladly allow you to purchase a matching set of Dianese leathers with integrated airbags and a matching Arai carbon fiber helmet. As if you’d be caught dead at a track day in anything else!

Still got more money burning a hole in your pocket? Here’s another exclusive opportunity (to spend cash) from Ducati.

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Illustration for article titled Ducatis New All-Carbon Superleggera V4 Costs $285 Per Pound

The package that Ducati has prepared for enthusiasts who purchase a Superleggera V4 also includes access to the “SBK Experience”, allowing owners to ride the Panigale V4 R, which competes in the SBK World Championship, on a test track at Mugello. Even more amazingly, 30 Superleggera V4 owners will have an exclusive opportunity to enjoy the “MotoGP Experience” and live the dream of every racing enthusiast. For the very first time, they will be able to ride a circuit on the Desmosedici GP20 used by Dovizioso and Petrucci, with the close support of the Ducati Corse technicians.

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Illustration for article titled Ducatis New All-Carbon Superleggera V4 Costs $285 Per Pound

Wow. Wow. Wow. Just imagine how many bikes you could buy for $100,000. Hell, you could buy THREE Panigale V4 S for you and two friends. And have enough left over for a trip around the best riding roads and track days of Europe.

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Illustration for article titled Ducatis New All-Carbon Superleggera V4 Costs $285 Per Pound
Illustration for article titled Ducatis New All-Carbon Superleggera V4 Costs $285 Per Pound
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Illustration for article titled Ducatis New All-Carbon Superleggera V4 Costs $285 Per Pound
Illustration for article titled Ducatis New All-Carbon Superleggera V4 Costs $285 Per Pound
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Illustration for article titled Ducatis New All-Carbon Superleggera V4 Costs $285 Per Pound

Jalopnik contributor with a love for everything sketchy and eclectic.

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DISCUSSION

Okay, so I’ve just recently began reading some of Jalopniks admittedly well-written bike posts, and this one struck me with a good bit of questions. How does one control wheelies when riding at insane speed? Obviously they can’t steer or anything, so do you just causally ease off the throttle, or..? Also, why are the brakes of such different sizes? And do you brake using the front or rear, or if both, then when? And back to the wheelies, if you’re ripping a big wheelie at high speed wouldn’t the winglets on the side kinda kick your nose upwards? And how can riders make their knee come so close down to the track? Any little bump could send a little shake through their body making their knee scrape the ground and screw up their life. Seems like a dangerous thing... albeit I am speaking of motorcycles here.