Blip: I'd Be On Board With A Full-Size Jeep Truck. Just Maybe Not This One

Illustration for article titled Blip: I'd Be On Board With A Full-Size Jeep Truck. Just Maybe Not This One
Image: Rob O’Keefe

If a truck has “Jeep” and “Wrangler” written on it, and the doors are off, then is it a real Jeep?

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Spotted in Norwood, MA by a reader named Rob, this Super Duty truck is battered and bruised, adorned with Jeep “badging” and celebratory high school graduation-related text, and devoid of at least the passenger-side door.

Rob says this appears to be a government surplus truck, since there’s a Massport tag on the driver’s side of the tailgate (Massport is the port authority that runs the Logan airport in Boston). The vehicle may have come sans door, Rob says, but he’s guessing the lack of a passenger-side closure is just intentional tomfoolery.

“What I can’t determine is whether “Jeep” was written ironically or aspirationally?” he poses.

In any case, I’m all for a real full-size Jeep truck. The old Gladiator was technically a full-size truck when it came out for the 1963 model year, and was even offered in heavy-duty guise (see Jeep J20, J3000, and J4000) through out its glorious ~25 year run. Why not bring that thing back to compete with the likes of the Ford F-250 Tremor? Just throw a Jeep grille on a Ram. It’s not that hard.

Sr. Tech Editor, Jalopnik. Owner of far too many Jeeps (Including a Jeep Comanche). Follow my instagram (@davidntracy). Always interested in hearing from engineers—email me.

DISCUSSION

Dirka

If a truck has “Jeep” and “Wrangler” written on it, and the doors are off, then is it a real Jeep?

Absolutely not! Either commit and cut off the windshield too or don’t write that on the side. At best this is a bronco

cowards! And by cowards I mean people who don't want to be pelted in the face by rocks and quite likely pulled over for having an illegal vehicle depending on local law.