At $5,900, Might This 1993 Range Rover LWB Be In Your Price Range?

Illustration for article titled At $5,900, Might This 1993 Range Rover LWB Be In Your Price Range?
Photo: Craigslist
Nice Price Or No DiceIs this used car a good deal? You decide!

Range Rover is known as one of the world’s premier luxury off-roader marques, but not known necessarily the most dependable. With over 250K on the clock, today’s Nice Price or Crack Pipe 1993 edition calls that rep into question. Let’s see how questionable its price might be.

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Do you remember that scene in The Simpsons where Bart single-frames through the VCR video to catch the exact moment when Lisa broke Ralph Wiggums’ heart? If only actual turning points in life were so easily identified.

Case in point: when exactly did the pickup truck go from simple workhorse to lifestyle accessory? Whatever the epoch-defining date, it most certainly followed the point in time when yesterday’s 1984 Toyota Pickup hit the streets. Think about it—Toyota didn’t even bother to give this generation of truck a name, using just Pickup instead of the prior Hilux or succeeding Tacoma. Hell, that’s like naming your dog “Dog.” Lazy!

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Simplicity can be seen as a virtue in many things and in the case of that Toyota, it means a reputation for indestructibility and Rick Astley-levels of never gonna let you down-ness. At a $5,500 asking, those were seen as valuable attributes, and in the end, the truck picked up a respectable 60 percent Nice Price win, plain and simple.

Toyota has long cultured a reputation for their products being durable. Hell, in 1999 they ran an ad that claimed the Corolla was so reliable you could “practically weld the hood shut.” That’s a great rep for a company and really stands out since it’s a claim that not all automakers can make.

Illustration for article titled At $5,900, Might This 1993 Range Rover LWB Be In Your Price Range?

As an example of such a competitive disadvantage, consider Land Rover. That stalwart British builder of off-roaders and luxury 4X4s has consistently been a tail-dragger in almost every quality and durability indicator survey you can name.

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That reputation for spending more time on the side of the road instead of on it (or off it in Land Rover’s case) has made the marque a bit of a cautionary tale on the used car market. That being said, the company does have its fans and models like the Disco II have garnered an enviable following with the off-roader crowd.

Illustration for article titled At $5,900, Might This 1993 Range Rover LWB Be In Your Price Range?
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Another model that has seen its fortunes turn around in recent times is the original Range Rover. Whether it has been through attrition bringing supply below a stable demand, or just time wounding all heels, values on the pre-P38 models have recently been on the ascent.

With over 250,000 miles on the clock, this 1993 Range Rover LWB stands in defiance of the marque’s bad rap rep, and as we will see, it also comes with a price that doesn’t necessarily make it feel like it has yet to board the crazy train.

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Illustration for article titled At $5,900, Might This 1993 Range Rover LWB Be In Your Price Range?

The LWB edition of the OG Range Rover added eight inches to the wheelbase of the original, bringing it up to 108 overall. This was used under the old body to prep for the successor P38 which shared the same span. The added length made the rear seat much more capacious and with longer doors, it was easier to jump in and out of as well.

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Another change with this version was the adoption of Rover’s EAS (Electronic Air Suspension) in place of the previous coils. Geez, that name even SOUNDS unreliable. In fact, while the air suspension did offer the cool ability to raise or lower the car’s ride height through a full five-inches of travel it did prove frustratingly flaky over time.

Illustration for article titled At $5,900, Might This 1993 Range Rover LWB Be In Your Price Range?
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Fortunately, this car has an Old Man Emu steel spring conversion which eliminates all the problems. Other updates here include a switch to the robust LT230 transfer case and head work on the 4.2-litre V8 that was done at 180K.

The all-alloy “Buick” V8 has served as Rover’s big dog for decades and has had a number of durability issues crop up over that time. Heads are just one of them, but it’s a plus that this car has apparently seen some work to keep them healthy.

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The bodywork looks to be in excellent shape, with English White paint that seems to hold a shine and has not suffered over time. A bull bar fronts the car and carries a pair of round spots in its mid-section. Up top, there’s a roof rack, while down below you’ll find body-matched factory alloys. The tires wrapping those are said to still sport a good bit of tread.

Illustration for article titled At $5,900, Might This 1993 Range Rover LWB Be In Your Price Range?
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The interior benefits from a redone headliner—yet another place where Land Rover quality seems perennially lacking—and a good bit of leather and wood. The bolster seam on the driver’s throne has split its stitching and is in need of repair, but other than that it all looks reasonably serviceable.

In the minus column here, there is a non-functioning passenger door window, a bad stereo speaker and some minor oil leaks from the drivetrain. Oh my god, a British car that drips oil! Alert the media! Those of us with an affection for old British iron call that chassis lubrication and consider the viscous coating good rust prevention.

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Illustration for article titled At $5,900, Might This 1993 Range Rover LWB Be In Your Price Range?

The Range Rover’s title is clean and the car comes with a $5,900 asking price. As I noted, this generation of Range Rover is coming into its own amongst fans of the marque and those who appreciate its handsome styling and English drawing-room appeal. These will very likely continue their slow upward trend in value, much as did Jeep Grand Wagoneer a decade or so back.

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The question of the moment, however, is whether or not this one is worth that $5,900 asking. What do you think, would you spend that much for this Ranger Rover as it’s presented? Or, is that too much of a long shot for this long-wheelbase edition?

You decide!

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Seattle, WA Craigslist, or go here if the ad disappears.

H/T to Chris D. for the hookup!

Help me out with NPOCP. Hit me up at rob@jalopnik.com and send me a fixed-price tip. Remember to include your Kinja handle.

Rob Emslie is a contributing writer for Jalopnik. He has too many cars, and not enough time to work on them all.

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DISCUSSION

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RustyBolts

This thing would be perfect for my daughter... You know, a safe, slow vehicle.. A good starter car.