Illustration for article titled At $30,000, Would You Race To Buy This Street-Able ‘1976’ WCM Ultralite Racer?
Photo: Craigslist
Nice Price Or Crack PipeIs this used car a good deal? You decide!

Colin Chapman famously made his cars go faster by “adding lightness.” Today’s Nice Price or Crack Pipe “sort-of-a” Lotus Seven adds a hot Honda mill to that lightness. We’ll have to see if that’s worth lightening your wallet a considerable bit to buy it.

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How cheap would a car have to be for you to “drive it ’til it breaks?” I guess that would depend on the car. If your six-figure E-type were to crap out due to a bad alternator or blown hose you’d probably call for the flatty posthaste.

What, however, about something like yesterday’s 1996 Isuzu Trooper SE? That old truck sure seemed to have a good bit of life left in it. It also seemed like a pretty nice place to spend some quality road time. The thing is, at $2,400 there’s a lot to consider should something like a head gasket go, or maybe even when a new set of tires are on the docket.

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Regardless of its chances of future abandonment by you cold-hearted animals, fully 83 percent of you felt it worthy of having in the here and now at that modest asking, earning the truck a solid Nice Price win.

Illustration for article titled At $30,000, Would You Race To Buy This Street-Able ‘1976’ WCM Ultralite Racer?

Hey, do you remember that Honda S2000 with the LS3 from last Friday? Did that engine-swapped sports car get you wondering where its original engine may have landed? If so, take a gander at this World Class Motorsports pocket rocket. It’s seemingly titled as a 1976 Lotus Super 7, and it has a 2-litre VTEC four clean out of an S2000. Sadly, it’s a JDM mill and not the one li’l orphan annie’d out of Friday’s car. *sad trombone*

World Class Motorsports built the Ultralite as a homage to Lotus’ iconic Super 7 basing it around the S2000's 240 horsepower VTEC mill. That nestles in a square-section tube frame which is supported by an adjustable coil-over suspension at both ends. The Honda six-speed gearbox sends the power back to an adapted Subaru WRX limited-slip rear-end and the whole thing is wrapped in a skimpy fiberglass body. That runs cycle fenders upfront and an asymmetrical roll-over bar on top that will make your passenger wonder who you care more—yourself or them.

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Illustration for article titled At $30,000, Would You Race To Buy This Street-Able ‘1976’ WCM Ultralite Racer?

WCM built about 100 of these lightweight monsters. Of those, this one is claimed to be number 27. It’s ideally a track car, as evidenced by the meats it’s wearing on its handsome alloy wheels. That being said, the seller does seem to have it licensed for the road—in California, no less—claiming it to also be smog-exempt.

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I don’t know how all that works, but from the pictures, I can say that this is a special events car, not something for commuting to work while chilling on NPR and sipping your double half-caf latte. First off, it’s freaking tiny. The factory claimed a 1,240-pound curb weight for these, and if your good at math you’ll know that means a remarkable 5.1 pounds per pony with the VTEC engine. That’s better than the last Dodge Viper SRT or outgoing Corvette Z06.

Illustration for article titled At $30,000, Would You Race To Buy This Street-Able ‘1976’ WCM Ultralite Racer?
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The next thing you might notice is that the car lacks a full windscreen and associated wipers. No screen/no wipers—it’s a great weight saving strategy. Instead of a picture window through which to view the fast-approaching world, these cars employ a pair of Brooklands screens. Those look like they’ll do little more than scalp you should you be so unfortunate as to hit something having forgotten to strap yourself in, but they do look cool nonetheless.

Illustration for article titled At $30,000, Would You Race To Buy This Street-Able ‘1976’ WCM Ultralite Racer?
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The build looks exemplary. Much like the Maxton we looked at earlier this week, these were not kits but component cars, constructed in WCM’s shop just to the point of dropping-in the driveline. The company did fine work and you’ll note a good bit of design and engineering that improved on that of its Lotus role model. The Honda mill is said to be JDM and it talks to an AEM-sourced ECU.

The seller describes the car’s condition as ‘immaculate’ and says it’s a great grocery getter despite the utter lack of storage space when shopping two-up. Also somewhat surprising owing to its obvious whackadoodle nature, there are only 450 miles said to be under its tires.

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Illustration for article titled At $30,000, Would You Race To Buy This Street-Able ‘1976’ WCM Ultralite Racer?

The asking is $30,000 which, when considered just on its zero to sixty time of just over 3 seconds, seems a bargain. Of course we can’t all have expensive playthings and so you know need to vote on whether or not you think this ‘Lotus’ is worth the asking. What do you think, would you pay $30K for this 7 homage? Or, is that too much green for a car that looks like it only eats red meat?

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You decide!

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San Francisco Bay Area, CA Craigslist, or go here if the ad disappears.

H/T to RevUnlimiter for the hookup!

Help me out with NPOCP. Hit me up at rob@jalopnik.com and send me a fixed-price tip. Remember to include your Kinja handle.

Rob Emslie is a contributing writer for Jalopnik. He has too many cars, and not enough time to work on them all.

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