A Morning at the Classic Car Club of Manhattan

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On our way to drive the Ariel Atom at Lime Rock Park, we stopped by the Hudson Street headquarters of the Classic Car Club of Manhattan. At 6 AM on a Sunday, nobody was around—except the cars.

Steps from the Manhattan entrance of the Holland Tunnel, the club’s HQ is a vast open space, dotted with classic cars, supercars and the machinery to keep them alive and healthy. You can see the whole roster of cars available to their members at the club’s website. Until you pony up the funds to become a member, enjoy this quiet stroll through what they had in the shop as John Krewson and I were about to head out of town.

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1974 Triumph TR6

Insert overused joke about not driving this very far from the club.

Illustration for article titled A Morning at the Classic Car Club of Manhattan

2006 Ariel Atom

The club’s Atom is a 2.5 model: the chassis is an Atom 2, whereas the engine is the same Honda unit found in the Atom 3 Krewson drove at Lime Rock Park.

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1975 Ferrari 308 GT4

Look at the wall and you’ll see a line painting of this very car a 308 GTB/GTS—executed by none other than Camilo Pardo, designer of the Ford GT. Which, incidentally, is one of the cars in the club’s fleet of modern supercars.

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1966 Ford Mustang Fastback

Behind the Mustang is John Krewson and behind him are old German and Italian exotica.

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Buckets

Car paraphernalia at the head of a service bay, right below Pardo’s painting of the Ferrari.

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2007 BMW Z4M Coupé

The last car to come with the awesomest engine ever made by BMW: the straight-six 333 HP S54B32, also found in the E46 M3. Behind the Bimmer is the Atom.

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Lewd Signage Above Atom

That rod is what will prevent your head from coming apart should you flip the Atom.

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The Atom’s Headlight

Further proof that Ariel’s supercharged shopping cart is in fact street legal.

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Screws

Cars need fixin’ at times!

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Toolbox

I spoke English and was allowed to stay. Those with keen eyes shall spot the 24 Hours of Lemons sticker (it’s below and to the right of the flag previously seen on the grounds of the State Capitol in Columbia, South Carolina).

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The Offices

Krewson knows I’ve got my viewfinder trained on him. Notice artistic paint overflow.

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1996 Porsche 993 C4S

The last of the air-cooled 911’s. This car has one of the sexiest rear wheelarches in recorded history. Also, water cooling is for sissies.

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1974 Triumph TR6

What was I saying a few captions ago about not driving it far from life support? Oh, never mind.

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1975 Alfa Romeo GTV

Do not approach this car if you’re not wearing a well-cut suit. It will sense your lack of style and expend all the voltage in its battery to shock you into submission.

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DISCUSSION

Navalb
Al Navarro

I don't know if I believe in fractional ownership so much. Mostly because I feel that if you are truly passionate about a particular car, you should just buy it and let it be 100% your own headache and 100% your own joy.

Can't afford to buy or finance or maintain a 308? Then maybe you shouldn't be owning one. I could perhaps excuse fractional ownership with kilo-buck cars, but then again, I know lots of people who have several multi-million dollar cars in their various and sundry garages.

Sole ownership means no worries about d-bags mussing up your headrests with gel. But of course, depending on the car you buy, the frequency, complexity, and costs of repairs may have you end up feeling like you want to slam a driveshaft into your skull.