1969 Ford Econoline Custom 300 Super Van

Illustration for article titled 1969 Ford Econoline Custom 300 Super Van

Of course we all prefer the flatnosed pre-1968 Econolines, but the next generation of Ford vans got the job done too. After the passage of a few decades, we can start to pick out a bit of once-overlooked style in these early second-gen Econolines.

Illustration for article titled 1969 Ford Econoline Custom 300 Super Van

This is a Super Van, folks (the Average Van being a couple trim levels down on the food chain), so you know it's special.

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Illustration for article titled 1969 Ford Econoline Custom 300 Super Van

What we're dealing with here is a classic Serial Killer Van. Just tape some tinfoil over the back windows, put on those creepy yellow-tinted sunglasses, and you'll be ready cut a swath of vengeance through the society that done you wrong! Serial killer on board or not, this van looks mean.

Illustration for article titled 1969 Ford Econoline Custom 300 Super Van

The incredible aluminum-ness of this grille is starting to grow on me; no attempt to imitate chrome, and- better still- no plastic. Bonus points for the Mad Max white spoked wheels and cheapo "Wild Country" tires. The license plate frame from the long-defunct Morris Landy dealership ("Another Dandy From Morris Landy") is a nice touch.

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Illustration for article titled 1969 Ford Econoline Custom 300 Super Van

We see another example of the kind of slow, relatively inoffensive rust you get around these parts. Most likely there's some leakage during the rainy season, but you just drill some drain holes in the floor and everything's fine.

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Illustration for article titled 1969 Ford Econoline Custom 300 Super Van

Not sure if you could get the Super Van without also having it be a Custom to boot.

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Illustration for article titled 1969 Ford Econoline Custom 300 Super Van

All in all, a pretty well-preserved specimen of a working late-60s Ford van, decades after most of them were ground into oblivion beneath their loads.

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DISCUSSION

econobiker
econobiker

Cali based all its life and it still has rust at the bottom of the rear door. These vans had about a decade of service life in most of the rest of the US- the water/salt got into the bottom of the doors and side panels and ate them away to nothing.

This Supervan is an E200 model- my family had a '71 E300 converted to a camper by the original owner even including the Turtle Top pop up roof. By the time we got rid of the '71 in 1987 the rust holes in the side doors were big enough to put your fist through and the lower feature line between the driver door and rear wheel was entirely gone...

WestCoaster- yes the base delivery / telephone vans had the painted only grills and no aluminum side covers like this one.

And BTW - the Dodge vans were the prefered van for serial killers...