3/18/20
8:45 AM
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In Hong Kong, a right-hand-drive 1966 Ford Mustang convertible sits next to a Pagoda. That’s the nickname for the ’60s-era W113 Mercedes-Benz 230 SL with the concave roof that resembles “curved roofs of Far Eastern temples.” I honestly don’t know which 1960s “2+2" I find more beautiful.

3/16/20
8:45 AM
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This 1991 Dodge Caravan does not deserve such a fate. Despite its longtime Michigan residency, the van isn’t completely covered in rust; its awesome, sporty “ES”-trim lower body cladding and grille still look great; and even the interior remains a thing of beauty. A 3.0-liter V6 sits under hood, and though its

3/14/20
9:00 AM
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Beginning in 1968, around 10,000 Subaru 360s were imported into the United States. The car achieved notoriety when Consumer Reports branded it “Not Acceptable,” based on fuel mileage numbers less than half of advertised, dangerous doors that came open during testing, and a 0-60 time of 37 seconds. Weighing less than

3/12/20
8:45 AM
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Here’s a great page from a brochure for the U.S. market 1974 Triumph Spitfire 1500. It shows and describes the full powertrain and drivetrain layout (pushrod inline four with a “Stromberg 150 COSEV” carburetor, four-speed manual, rear drive) and suspension setup (double wishbone up front, swing axle out back). But the

3/9/20
8:45 AM
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A 1994 second-gen Ford Taurus SHO sits at a junkyard just outside of Ann Arbor, its beautiful Yamaha-designed variable-length intake manifold having mercifully been yanked and spared from the crusher. The vehicle—sadly equipped with a four-speed automatic—had a few rust spots, but appeared to be in decent shape.

3/7/20
9:45 AM
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Over a thousand Yugos were sold on its first day on sale in the United States. Motor Trend nominated it for its Import Car of the Year award. Fortune named it in one of a dozen Outstanding Products for 1985. Things went really well for the Yugo, right up until people actually got the car.

3/1/20
2:05 PM
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I’ve said it before and I’ll say it again. B-Pillars are for chumps. I stand by that position and no amount of road-noise whining will change it. None.

2/29/20
9:00 AM
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I visited my doctor today to understand why I can’t stop thinking about the second-generation Oldsmobile Bravada. “It’s just a Chevy Blazer,” I told her, “This makes no sense!” When she asked what I though might be the cause of my ailment, I guessed that perhaps it’s the trusty and torquey 4.3-liter V6 luring me in.N

2/28/20
10:00 PM
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Sir MixALot couldn’t quite get his Turbo ‘Vette in 1986, but he could definitely get a Turbo Sprint, and that’s just as good. Rev up your one-liter inline-three cylinder and dump the clutch, we’re chirping front tires into the weekend, folks.

2/27/20
10:00 PM
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No matter what your team boss tells you, Verstappen, the shortcut through the trackside fencing isn’t a good idea. Besides, now all of the sheep will get out of their pasture. No es bueno, Max.

2/27/20
8:45 AM
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Please, Nondescript Race Car Museum—I’ll be gentle with the Tyrrell. I don’t even want to drive it! I just want to settle in and sip champagne behind the wheel like François Cevert in 1972. I’m not asking too much, honestly. I even brought my own bottle!

2/24/20
8:45 AM
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Hmm. What’s the right caption for this image? It is “What did you do with your weekend?” Nah, that’s too generic. What about “An AMC 360 V8 engine rises from a Golden Eagle like a phoenix.” No, I can’t have two birds in one simile—I think there’s a law on that somewhere.

Instead, I’ll just say that the 1979 Jeep

2/23/20
2:05 PM
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Aston Martin has pressed pause on its WEC hypercar project, meaning that it’ll be some time before we see a successor to the DBR1-2, also known as the Lola-Aston Martin B09/60. With the V12 out of the DBR9 GT1 car in a body built by Lola Cars with some help from Prodrive, this specific DBR1-2 came in fourth at Le Mans

2/22/20
9:45 AM
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In the early 1970s, you had a few options for a rear-wheel-drive hemi powered Dodge. One of them was a Mitsubishi.

2/18/20
8:45 AM
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I fell in love this Valentine’s Day. While visiting my coworker Jason in North Carolina, my fellow Jalop pontificated about the virtues of Renault’s trusty R4, a basic french car introduced in the early 1960s as the “blue jeans” of automobiles. It was simple, durable, practical, accessible to the masses, and became so

2/16/20
9:45 AM
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In 1950, the best selling import manufacturer in the U.S. was Ford. Cars like the Anglia and Prefect were manufactured by Ford UK, and some of them came to the States. In 1959, the year of this advertisement, 42,413 English Fords were sold in the U.S., and most were 100E Anglias.

2/15/20
9:45 AM
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In 1958, houses were smaller and cars were bigger, so much so that this Mercury Park Lane Phaeton Coupe had a footprint 10% as big as the average U.S. house at the time. Also, thanks to its 430 cubic inch v8, it could warm up the cabin, and everyone else for several feet in any direction. 

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