It Must Be Tough To Defend Cash For Clunkers For A Living

Illustration for article titled It Must Be Tough To Defend Cash For Clunkers For A Living

It's been more than four years since the sorry ploy to boost the economy that was called Cash For Clunkers was released onto the American public and the used car market, and the case for it has yet to improve. Doesn't it just seem to cost more and more every day?

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This time around it's the claim that the initiative cost taxpayers $1.4 million for every job it created, which sounds like a terrible deal and a very hard pill for car enthusiasts to ever come to terms with. No matter how many Ford Explorers it sent to the crusher.

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Which makes us wonder, what if it's your job to defend Cash For Clunkers these days? Who has the unenviable task of seeing all the bad press out there and getting the death stares from car folks?

Victorious Secret has an idea:

Illustration for article titled It Must Be Tough To Defend Cash For Clunkers For A Living

This describes the jackasses who came up with C for C wonderfully.

And duurtlang responds accordingly:

Hey, I work for a government and am thoroughly offe... Nah, you're right.

Oh, Cash For Clunkers defender, whoever you are, no one wants your job.

Photo: Flickr/Tony Fischer

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DISCUSSION

Every Undergradaute student interested in Economics that goes through the University of Chicago (Neoclassical Economics capital of the USA) is given a full speech from Allan Sanderson about how a former student of his had a huge hand in forming the Cash for Clunkers program, and that if he could (exaggerating, maybe...) he could revoke their grade in his course from when they took it.

This is, in many cases, the very first thing that these aspiring Economics majors learn at that school: Cash For Clunkers was a terrible idea.

The hate is pretty much universal.