Detroit Auto Show: Improving the Cube: Nissan Bevel Concept

This image was lost some time after publication.
This image was lost some time after publication.

For a longtime, one of our favorite "you can't buy it here" cars has been the Nissan Cube. We've been scratching our heads as to why that is, especially given the success of Honda's Element and Scion's xB. The Cube was boxier than both of 'em, featured an asymmetrical rear-end and well, Nissan's are typically OK rides. However, the Ghosn boys just released some shots of the Cube's replacement, the terribly named Bevel (Angle was apparently copyrighted). We like it. We like all panel van looking cars. Blind spots be damned. Still, if the above is the Bevel, and the Rogue looks like this, what on earth is the white JDM box-mobile Autoblog caught running around LA? Regardless, clock the interior after the jump.

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Nissan Rogue Crossover SUV and Nissan Bevel Concept Set to Debut At 2007 North American International Auto Show [Nissan News]

Related:
Holy Nissan, It's The Cube-amino! [Internal]

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Oh. My. Gawd. Here are the desingers quotes...read 'em and...snicker...

"Our goal in designing the Bevel exterior was to maximize functionality and minimize the use of visual distractions such as door handles, big exhaust pipes, or splashy lighting," said Campbell . "At the same time, we wanted the little details to reflect Bevel's utility theme, which is why there is a recurring use of hexagons in the vehicle's design - reminiscent of a socket or a tool - in the wheels, grille, and even the disc brake venting."

"Bevel is designed as a useful and rewarding vehicle for the 'Everyday Hero' - the guy who's always ready to help out a neighbor, a friend or around his community," explains Bruce Campbell, the ponytailed vice president of design at Nissan Design America, the automaker's styling think tank, in La Jolla, Calif.