Before the world of watches is taken over by e-ink (if it ever is), those in the market for a watch will have to contend with the availability of ana-digi watches that combine the classic look of an analog watch with the benefits of a flexible LED display. These range from the expensive $7K Tag Heuer to the cheap knock-off Seikos. As with anything sporting a digital display, it never looks like a super expensive watch, making it a watch I don't feel compelled to pay a lot for. When I look at them online I tend to convince myself that I'm better off paying a little more for a cheap watch from a respected brand rather than a (relatively) expensive watch from, like, Casio. Owners of the Shelby GT500 will likely have this problem. Actually, any Mustang buyer says LuckyChuck.

There's this problem I have.

Every so often I'll go on a car website and build a car as if I were to buy it. I'll try to stay true to a budget, so it's not entirely fantasy.

Whenever I do this with a Mustang, I start with the base V6 coupe for about $23000. Then I figure since I want to be happy with it and it's a car I have to live with for the next 10 years, I go for the extra packages.

At that point I'm at $35k, and I decide I might as well upgrade to a GT.

So I get the GT, but with all kinds of add-ons - satnav, stereo, stripes - and end up at around $45k.

Okay, so I've about doubled my initial price, but I'll end up with a proper V8 muscle car and not something a V6 making loud noises.

Along comes 2012 Shelby.

Now I'll see that the Shelby is only a couple grand more and since I have to live with this for the next ten years and I want to be happy with my purchase, I upgrade to the Shelby. Afterall, I don't want to be looking at my Mustang GT always thinking that if I had had a few grand more I could have had something better.

Eventually I'll end up at about $80 grand and decide what I really want is an Aston Martin, realize I'm on crack, and start building a Kia Rio.