When men were men they didn't order coffee from Starbucks, they brewed it with a fire they built, from beans they'd crushed, in a mug advertising the name of a tool manufacturer. When men were men (and women were women) they didn't call a repairman when the washing machine broke, they took the whole thing apart, by hand, with no tools and rebuilt whatever was broken. When men were men they didn't exchange virtual business cards, but shook hands and when they did the dirt on their palms communicated their address, name, phone number, position and hardhat size. When men were men they didn't complain about used cars that might break down, they looked forward to the opportunity to get dirty. Just ask Unevolved

Any DSM. As a wise man once told me, "The problem with DSMs is they're fast and idiots can afford them."

In all seriousness, I think a stock fourth-generation Supra would be a wise investment choice. That's going to be a collector's car in a decade or so.

Same with the 240SX, actually. You may laugh, but that car was built in smaller numbers than the S30 and S31 chassis, especially in the states. Give it 20 years, and those will be the new Camaros and Novas. Our generation won't tell stories about the huge displacements of yore, we'll regale our grandchildren with stories of 30+psi Evos.

Afterthought: After reading through the comments, you people are a bunch of spineless, grease-fearing Jezebel posters. "Oh no! It might break!" Of course it's going to break. It's a mechanical object. And then you can fix it with your own two hands and make it better and faster than it was before, and establish a bond few other drivers on the road share with their cars.