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At $2,999, Could This Mega-Mileage 2005 Acura TSX Still Be A Mega-Good Deal?

Illustration for article titled At $2,999, Could This Mega-Mileage 2005 Acura TSX Still Be A Mega-Good Deal?
Photo: Craigslist
Nice Price Or No DiceIs this used car a good deal? You decide!

With over 200K on the clock, today’s Nice Price or Crack Pipe Acura has certainly been around the block. Let’s see if its price and rare six-speed stick more than make up for those miles.

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It’s been so long since Nissan went by Datsun here in the U.S. that few non-car people likely are even aware of that brand’s one-time name. That is, of course, unless they’re non-car people from one of the Southeast Asian countries where the marque has been relaunched. They would probably know.

For the rest, yesterday’s 1966 Datsun 411 wagon must have been an anomaly. It represented an unfamiliar brand and came in a patina-heavy package that was the polar opposite of what one would normally seek in a used car. All that potential for confusion was exacerbated by the car’s $4,500 asking price, and it fell in a 72 percent Crack Pipe loss.

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Illustration for article titled At $2,999, Could This Mega-Mileage 2005 Acura TSX Still Be A Mega-Good Deal?

When you think of Acura—if you ever even do think of Acura—what pops into your head? It’s the NSX, right? Probably the beloved Ayrton Senna-developed first generation, I would guess. Maybe you imagine that model’s current high-tech hybrid edition but let’s be serious here, the one you’d really rather have is the OG, amiright? Suffice to say, few other of the marque’s products have that same kind of mental stickiness. I mean heck, can you even tick off the names of Acura’s current line up?

Of course, that’s not to say that, extant the NSX, Acura’s offerings have all been less than memorable. Take for example this 2005 Acura TSX. This is a tidy little four-door sport sedan that comes with a 200 horsepower 2.4-litre four, and a six-speed stick. I’ll bet that get’s your attention.

Illustration for article titled At $2,999, Could This Mega-Mileage 2005 Acura TSX Still Be A Mega-Good Deal?
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The original TSX was an adoptee into Acura’s U.S. lineup. First made available for the 2003 model year, the car was based on the Honda Accord sold in the JDM and European markets. Car buyers in both those areas seemingly prefer smaller cars, and hence received a different, and more compact Accord than we got at the time here in the U.S.. Luckily, we got the Euro-cord too, just with fancy-pants Acura badges and an upscale interior.

I’d say that the body style has held up well over time, better in fact than has that of its succeeding model. The simple lines and Alfa-like taillamp treatment on these still looking reasonably modern and clean today. The interior of the TSX is also one of the best Honda has done.

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Illustration for article titled At $2,999, Could This Mega-Mileage 2005 Acura TSX Still Be A Mega-Good Deal?

This one comes in Nighthawk Black Pearl over an ebony interior. The seller says of it: “Interior and exterior are clean save some signs of normal wear and tear” and that’s reflected in the pics. The paint looks like it could stand a good cleaning, and the plastic covers over the headlamps show the need for some attention. On the plus side, there’s no evidence of road rot, and the factory alloys look to be clean and unmarred.

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The interior presents well, albeit with some tears in the driver’s seat. Both shift knob and steering wheel also exhibit obvious use over time. Nothing is too bad, save for the rip on the driver’s throne. And no, you can’t just cover that with black duct tape.

Illustration for article titled At $2,999, Could This Mega-Mileage 2005 Acura TSX Still Be A Mega-Good Deal?
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Mechanically, the ad claims that “everything works as it should,” and says that the car “runs and drives very strong and is free of mechanical issues.” Recent mechanical issues that have been repaired include the throttle body, intake manifold, and A/C components.

That seems a small price to pay for the car’s impressive 221,000-mile lifetime. That’s a huge number of miles to pile up on any old car, but this being a Honda, and one of a generation prior to major complexities, it may just hold up a while longer and a few miles more.

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Illustration for article titled At $2,999, Could This Mega-Mileage 2005 Acura TSX Still Be A Mega-Good Deal?

In order to do that, someone will need to come up with the seller’s $2,999 asking. These cars generally hold their value reasonably well, but this one is a bit of a conundrum as while it is dunned by a major bout of mileage-itus, it’s also imbued with the six-speed stick—a rare and desirable option. The title, it should be noted, is clean.

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Where does your alliance lie with this TSX and that $2,999 price? Does that seem like a fair deal to row your own in one of Acura’s more memorable rides? Or, is that too much for a car with that many miles, no matter what?

You decide!

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Houston, TX Craigslist, or go here if the ad disappears.

H/T to Dan M. for the hookup!

Help me out with NPOCP. Hit me up at rob@jalopnik.com and send me a fixed-price tip. Remember to include your Kinja handle.

Rob Emslie is a contributing writer for Jalopnik. He has too many cars, and not enough time to work on them all.

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DISCUSSION

andrewpcollins
Andrew P. Collins

Man, there are some snobs in the comments here! Or maybe I just think that because I also have a 2005 200,000-mile 6MT Acura, haha.

On the real though: this is a lot of car for $3,000. Yeah, some things are going to be worn and might need replacing. Whatever. It’s a beautiful, practical car with an exceptional transmission for the price of a decent mountain bike! Nice price all day. I’d be crushed to sell my TL this cheap.