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This Supercharger Has a Datsun Roadster Attached to It

All image credits: Craigslist
All image credits: Craigslist

Superchargers are awesome because they provide extra power with a very linear delivery curve. There’s no lag because they aren’t exhaust driven. Obviously, there needs to be a car attached to a supercharger for it to be effective. This particular supercharger lives in the engine bay of a 1969 Datsun Roadster.

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Before we go any further, just listen to that blower whine:

Datsun Roadsters didn’t come from the factory supercharged. The owner of this purple one engine-swapped it with a 2.4-liter, Nissan KA24DE and then supercharged it. It has a Jim Wolfe ECU and was tuned by our friends at Z Car Garage in San Jose, California.

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According to a company blog post from 2011, the car is known as Datster. The supercharger was taken from a race car and “numerous modifications” were made so that it could fit. It’s mounted above the frame rail, the blog goes on, but is also beneath the intake runners. That meant that a custom throttle body and pulley system had to be made.

Also, it apparently makes 180 horsepower to the wheels. That’s more than enough to make a little thing like a Datsun Roadster rocket around. Like a go-kart from supercharged hell.

The supercharged Datsun is for sale now and you can take a look at its listing on Craigslist (ad saved here). Asking price is $22,500. It’s a little steep, but think of the fun and the smiles!

Illustration for article titled This Supercharger Has a Datsun Roadster Attached to It
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Illustration for article titled This Supercharger Has a Datsun Roadster Attached to It

Writer at Jalopnik and consumer of many noodles.

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DISCUSSION

mjensenwv
move-over-peasant-I-have-an-M5-in-the-shop

Speaking of superchargers, one of the guys I work with was telling me about his brother’s car which has, as he described it, “a turbo, but not an exhaust-driven turbo, a belt driven turbo.”

“Oh, like a supercharger?”

“No, it’s a belt-driven turbocharger.”

“Oh, ok.”