Good Gravy: AMG Is Getting 416 Horsepower Out of Just a 2.0-Liter Turbo Four

Illustration for article titled Good Gravy: AMG Is Getting 416 Horsepower Out of Just a 2.0-Liter Turbo Four

In every way I’ve seen so far, Mercedes-Benz has really stepped it up with the new A-Class and its coupe-ier sibling the CLA. What was once a penalty box designed solely to get millennials into dealerships and then trap them into leasing a more expensive SUV is now far nicer inside, packs much better tech and should put down serious power in AMG form. And in the new top-trim Mercedes-AMG A45 S, you will get some crazy numbers from just a 2.0-liter four.

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Mercedes this week announced that the new M 139 twin-scroll turbocharged four-cylinder engine will put out 416 horsepower and 369 lb-ft of torque in S form, and 382 HP and 354 lb-ft in standard trim. Both are a pretty sizable bump over the last batch of AMG turbo fours.

Illustration for article titled Good Gravy: AMG Is Getting 416 Horsepower Out of Just a 2.0-Liter Turbo Four
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Reportedly, this will be the most powerful four-cylinder engine currently in series production. Off the top of my head I can’t think of any other factory four-bangers putting out north of 400 HP, save for some of those old rare limited edition Mitsubishi Lancer Evolutions. Either way it’s a rolling symbol of just how good internal combustion engine technology is at the moment.

Motor 1 reports this new engine will report for duty in the A45 AMG hatchback that America sadly does not get. But we will see it in the CLA45 AMG sedan that is headed our way, so that’s good.

This thing sounds like a riot to drive, and I can’t wait to put its crazy noises into my ear-holes someday.

Editor-in-Chief at Jalopnik. 2002 Toyota 4Runner.

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DISCUSSION

hlorell
Hayden Lorell

I’m not an engineer, which is why I’m asking this question. But at what point does it become more economical to slap on two more cylinders rather than boosting the fuck out of these engines? It would seem that cranking these types of numbers out of such a small displacement would require massive amounts of fuel and put huge loads on the engine, limiting it’s longevity and reliability.

So at what point does it make more sense to increase displacement so you’re not straining the engine so much? I’ve never been one of those guys who thought there is no replacement for displacement, after all I drive a 3 liter V6 Nissan and I think it would be better with a smaller 2.5 or 2.6 inline. But it does seem that we are getting absurd with these 4-pot numbers.