This V8 Powered Rat Rod 964 Is A Middle Finger To Porsche Restomods

For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. So it stands to reason that for every 911 that Singer has meticulously “re-imagined” there is another craftsman who takes a classic Porsche and goes in a completely opposite direction.

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This creation comes from French hot rod shop Danton Arts Kustoms, and you can check out how this build came together on their website. Needless to say, some Porsche purists are going to have some feelings about this.

According to AutoEvolution, not only was the 964's air-cooled flat-six removed and replaced by a Ford big block V8, but the whole body has been chopped, stretched, and dropped to what can only be described as some kind of mutation between a one of Germany’s finest cars combined with a gnarly American hot rod.

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And as much as I love old Porsches, I have to say I kinda love it. The whole thing looks appropriate for some super-villain in some post apocalyptic vehicular death match.

Tom is a contributing writer for Jalopnik and runs AutomatchConsulting.com. He saves people money and takes the hassle out of buying or leasing a car. (Facebook.com/AutomatchConsulting)

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DISCUSSION

boomsticktmo
Boomsticktmo

Ok, I am sick of custom car companies replacing C with K... Don’t they know the origins or do they not care?

From wiki

K replacing c[edit]

Replacing the letter c with k in the first letter of a word came into use by the Ku Klux Klan during its early years in the mid-to-late 19th century. The concept is continued today within the group.

Barcelona squat and anarchist centre, labelled “OKUPA Y RESISTE”

In the 1960s and early 1970s in the United States, leftists, particularly the Yippies, sometimes used Amerika rather than America in referring to the United States.[1][2][3][4][5] It is still used as a political statement today.[6][7] It is likely that this was originally an allusion to the German spelling of the word, and intended to be suggestive of Nazism, a hypothesis that the Oxford English Dictionary supports.

In broader usage, the replacement of the letter c with k denotes general political skepticism about the topic at hand and is intended to discredit or debase the term in which the replacement occurs.[8]

A similar usage in Italian, Spanish, Catalan and Portuguese[citation needed] is to write okupa rather than ocupa (often on a building or area occupied by squatters,[9] referring to the name adopted by okupación activist groups), which is particularly remarkable because the letter “k” is rarely found in either Spanish, Portuguese or Italian words.[citation needed] It stems from Spanish anarchist and punk movements which used “k” to signal rebellion.[10]

Replacing “c” with “k” was at the centre of a Monty Python joke from the Travel Agent sketch. Eric Idle has an affliction that makes him pronounce the letter C as a B, as in “bolour” instead of “colour.” Michael Palin asks him if he can say the letter K? Idle replies that he can, and Palin suggests that he spell words with a K instead of C. Idle replies, “what, spell bolour with a K? Kolour. Oh! I never thought of that before! What a silly bunt!”[11]

The video game franchise Mortal Kombat is another example of this trend.

KKK replacing c or k[edit]

A common satiric usage of the letters KKK is the spelling of America as Amerikkka, alluding to the Ku Klux Klan, drawing to a perceived notion of an underlying or inherent racism in American society. The earliest known usage of Amerikkka recorded in the Oxford English Dictionary is in 1970, in a journal called Black World. Presumably, this was an extrapolation from the then already widespread Amerika.[clarification needed][citation needed]

The spelling Amerikkka came into greater use after the 1990 release of the gangsta rap album AmeriKKKa’s Most Wanted by Ice Cube, also used by rapper Spice 1 for his album AmeriKKKa’s Nightmare and by shock rock band Undercover Slut for their album Amerikkka Macht Frei.[citation needed]

The letters KKK have been inserted into several other words and names, to indicate similar perceived racism, oppression or corruption. Examples include: