2016 Ferrari 488 GTB: This Is It

Illustration for article titled 2016 Ferrari 488 GTB: This Is It

Since the introduction of the 308 in the mid 1970s, the entry level Ferrari has been powered by a naturally aspirated V8. That all ends today. Meet the Ferrari 488 GTB, a 3.8 liter turbocharged monster with 660 horsepower that gets to 60 in three seconds. I don't think Ferrari knows what "entry level" means.

Illustration for article titled 2016 Ferrari 488 GTB: This Is It

We've known that this day has been coming for a while. Emissions restrictions are starting to clamp down on all automakers, and slowly but surely we're seeing the days of high-revving, screaming naturally aspirated engines biting the dust.

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Illustration for article titled 2016 Ferrari 488 GTB: This Is It

And, unfortunately, today the extinction of the NA V8 has reached Ferrari.

Illustration for article titled 2016 Ferrari 488 GTB: This Is It

The 488 GTB is the first mid-engine V8 turbo Ferrari since the F40, and the numbers would actually put the F40 to shame. At 660, the new 488 GTB has about 200 MORE horsepower than the F40. Then it again, it also weighs about 1,000 pounds more than that legendary car (but 45 pounds less than the 458). That doesn't really seem to matter though, its performance makes the 458 Speciale now seem pointless.

Illustration for article titled 2016 Ferrari 488 GTB: This Is It
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Yes, 60 arrives in three seconds, the same as the Speciale. But that's where the similarities end. It gets to 125 in 8.3 seconds, a second faster than the Speciale. The top speed is at least 205 MPH. At Fiorano, Ferrari's private test track, the 488 GTB is a second quicker than the Speciale, and two seconds faster than the 458 it replaces.

Illustration for article titled 2016 Ferrari 488 GTB: This Is It
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Compared to the old 458, the 488 GTB looks more refined, smoother, and like a lot of time has been spent just making it faaaast. There are definite lessons from the 458 Speciale with the twin exhausts and even more active aero than the already crazy 458 had.

Illustration for article titled 2016 Ferrari 488 GTB: This Is It
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We'll see it in person at the Geneva Show, but we'll be dreaming of making out with it until then.

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DISCUSSION

OK, let's see if I can follow what they're doing here....

  • 2.6l = 206
  • 2.4l = 246
  • 2.0l = 208
  • 2.8l - 288 GTO
  • 3.0l = 308
  • 3.2l = 328
  • 3.4l = 348
  • 3.5l = 355
  • 3.6l = 360
  • 4.3l = 430
  • 4.5l = 458
  • 3.9l = 48.....8?

Ferrari has always used displacement (in deciliters) as the first two digits in their V6 and V8 models. Up until the 355, the last digit was always the number of cylinders, but they chose "5" because they wanted to show off the fact that it had a 5 valve head. The 360 and 430 didn't use the last digit for anything (as far as I know), and the 458 went back to the last digit representing the number of cylinders.

While they haven't been that consistent with that last digit over the years, they have been consistent with displaying the displacement. So what gives?

I think Ferrari threw their traditional small-engine naming convention out of the window so 488 owner egos wouldn't take a hit if they parked next to a 458.

If you think there is a better name for this model, what should it be?