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It's hard not to mention what's going on over at the Project 1221 skunkworks, if only because they just keep adding to the mystery with outrageous claims. This month may not be as shocking as last, with the announcement that the car will be powered by a turbine. But some details emerged that still stretch what we've come to expect, even from what we consider supercars. Let's bullet 'em, shall we?

· As noted in July, two models are are in the works — a rear-wheel-drive two-seater and an all-wheel-drive three-seater — which share a common engineering platform (MF1). The same longitudinally midship-mounted Williams gas turbine engine will power both cars. Both cars will offer a power-to-weight ratio of 1,000 hp/ton or better, as well as a target speed of (ahem) 270 mph.

· The three-seater MF1 has a 2+1 configuration with the third seat located in the middle behind the two front seats. When not in use the third seat can be folded providing extra luggage space that is accessible through a rear hatch. (Market research indicates that most drivers are accompanied by something like 1.2 passengers, so the third seat would be largely academic, since the 0.2 fella can probably be stuffed into the glove compartment.)

· The option of armored protection will be available only for the all-wheel-drive three-seater MF1. (This is good. Studies show people really hate people who drive jet cars on quiet suburban streets.)

· Production is set at 199 vehicles, comprising both models. (If they don't build the 200th, we gonna hold our breath until our face explodes, seriously.)

· A centrally mounted steering rack will enabling either left- or right-hand drive. (Why hasn't TVR come up with something like this? The US needs more sportscars.)

Related:
More on Italian Project 1221: April Update; Project 1221 Announces Deal with Turbine Engine Supplier; Another Piece of the Project 1221 Puzzle: 1500hp Turbine [internal]