This is also not how you want to find out that your car didn't have proper safety glass that breaks into nice chunks.

While kicking out a broken windshield is awesome, it also left a lot of extra glass shards I wasn't expecting. These were a huge mess when it came to taking out the gooey sealant around the edges of the windshield, too. Not only did I have this horrible tar-like gunk all over everything, it had sharp broken glass in it, too!

I'm an idiot.

I stupidly assumed that this Porsche 944 would have the same windshield as our 1983 944, which I had taken out with a large hammer after it was wrecked:

This one's windshield broke into chunks so nice that I could've used 'em as decorative pebbles. The new red car? Nope.

Porsche's "safety glass" from the early 1980s supposedly was nothing more than a thick coating on both sides of the glass meant to hold it together a bit more. I guess this meant that our blue '83 car was running a later windshield.

So, if you have to remove a windshield and know without a doubt that it's the safety glass that we know and love today, this is the awesome way to remove a windshield. Put some glasses on to keep errant chunks out of your eyeballs, hammer the glass around the edges to loosen up the outer seal and kick away.

If you don't know if it's actual modern safety glass, well, I'm sure there are some more delicate, less fun ways deal with it. Do that instead.

Disclaimer: No dudes were actually harmed in the making of the first video. I, however, got a small glass cut on my hand. I probably had that coming.