A Map Of The First Proposed U.S. Highway Network

Looking for good schools, good health, good morals, and good times? Well, then you'd need to find good roads first, according to the National Highway Association. Which is why the NHA drew up the first proposed highway plan in 1913. » 3/06/15 9:00am 3/06/15 9:00am

The Real Story Behind the 1914 Christmas Truce in World War I

It was 100 years ago this very night that something miraculous happened along the Western Front. After months of bitter fighting, soldiers on both sides gathered in no-man's-land in a spontaneous show of peace and goodwill. Here's what happened on that historic day — and why it marked the end of an era. » 12/24/14 11:00am 12/24/14 11:00am

The First American Rocket Pilot

The Bell X-1 in which Chuck Yeager shattered the sound barrier or the fabulous X-15, perhaps the world’s first spaceship, hardly sprang into being from nothing. They were the products of a long evolution of rocket-propelled aircraft that had its roots as far back as the seventeenth century, when legend tells (in… » 6/14/14 10:00am 6/14/14 10:00am

The Cutest Little Microcars Of The 20th Century

The microcar boom arrived after World War II, and gave us hundreds of beautiful little motors. These tiny cars provided the ultimate in personal transportation — but they also have oodles of personality. Check out the most adorable microcars of the 20th century. » 5/07/14 3:37pm 5/07/14 3:37pm

The Zeppelin Train, The Aerotrain And Other Classic Streamlined Trains

Long before there were bullet trains and high-speed light rail systems, people experimented with creating super-streamlined trains that could whisk people across the country in Googie splendor. In some alternate universe, these streamlined trains of the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s are still in service. » 4/18/14 2:34pm 4/18/14 2:34pm

Lockheed's Senior Peg: The Forgotten Stealth Bomber

Perhaps because it was built in secret and designed to be invisible, the stealth bomber is unforgettable the moment you see it. What few remember, though, is that the iconic silhouette almost looked like this. Here's the story of how Senior Peg came to be, why we didn't get it, and why we might want it back. » 3/01/14 3:40pm 3/01/14 3:40pm

Freedom Drop: The 1968 plan to nuke North Korea

When North Korea captured a U.S. Navy electronic surveillance ship, the USS Pueblo, in international waters in 1968, it was perhaps the worst security breach in U.S. history. One of the potential responses to North Korean aggression, drafted and approved by top military officials, was nuclear war. » 1/28/14 8:00am 1/28/14 8:00am

Long-Forgotten Photographs Reveal Challenger Disaster As It Happened

Michael Hindes of West Springfield, MA, was sorting through boxes of his grandparents' old photographs when he happened upon 26 harrowing photos of the Space Shuttle Challenger Disaster of 1986. To his knowledge, these photos have never been publicly released. » 1/16/14 8:00am 1/16/14 8:00am

Ghana's coffin art lets people bury their loved ones in style

In European cultures, we cremate our dead or bury them in a simple pine box. But coffins are a lot fancier in Ghana, where the Ga people believe that life continues in another world after death, and they want it to carry on in style. Here are some stunning examples of Ghana's famous coffin art. » 1/07/14 3:07pm 1/07/14 3:07pm

A map of 19th Century shipping routes and nothing else

Nautical trade routes stretch like so many lengths of string in this arresting visualization of intercontinental commerce in the 1800s. The map that emerges highlights not only several continents and their busiest ports, but the various trade winds that cycle through the lower reaches of Earth's atmosphere. » 1/05/14 11:00am 1/05/14 11:00am

These concrete arrows point the way across America

When United States Post Office planes took to the skies in the 1920s, they had their own version of the roadway's yellow line. A series of giant concrete arrows and gaslight beacons helped point the way from New York to San Francisco. » 11/17/13 2:00pm 11/17/13 2:00pm

The Strange and Wonderful History of Diving Suits, From 1715 to Today

Long before we had spacesuits, we had diving suits. The ocean was the first hostile environment that we sent people into, completely covered with protective gear. And the suits that people created with late-18th century or 19th century technology are astonighing to behold. See for yourself! » 9/06/13 3:26pm 9/06/13 3:26pm

How a pair of torpedos led to the worst shark attack in history

On July 26, 1945, the USS Indianapolis reached the island of Tinian, where it delivered the components and enriched uranium necessary for the atomic bomb Little Boy, which would soon devastate Hiroshima. But it's perhaps best known for its role in history's worst shark attack. » 8/10/13 8:00am 8/10/13 8:00am

An Illustrated History of Unbelievably Camouflaged Ships

It's difficult to hide from an enemy when you're inside an enormous ship, or part of a vast Naval fleet. And yet many ships in history have been well-camouflaged, despite a distinct lack of cloaking devices. Here are some of the most amazing examples. » 7/08/13 4:56pm 7/08/13 4:56pm

Real-Life Flying Saucers Prove That the Truth Is Right Here

We introduced you some of the weirdest aircraft of the 20th century before, but now it's time to talk about Earth's fleets of flying saucers. Check out these vehicles and concepts that show how we've been building UFOs all along. » 6/19/13 3:37pm 6/19/13 3:37pm

A Treasury of Flying Cars, from the Golden Age of Aviation

Every time you get in a traffic jam, you dream of pulling a lever, adding wings to your car, and soaring over the rest of the poor drivers. And then you wonder: Where's my flying car? The truth is, flying cars have existed for decades. You just wouldn't want most of these. » 6/03/13 3:19pm 6/03/13 3:19pm

Why Three Wheels Are Better Than Four

When it comes to automobiles, the conventional wisdom is you need four wheels or more. So why are there cars driving around with three wheels? We'll take a look at the science (and the economics) of tossing out one of your wheels. » 10/09/12 3:34pm 10/09/12 3:34pm

Thomas Edison's Car Battery Is Back And Better Than Ever

In 1901, Thomas Edison developed the recharcheable nickel-iron battery, a technology he hoped to see implemented in electric cars. But a slow rate of energy output and slower charging time saw it superseded by lead-acid and lithium-ion batteries in standard and electric cars alike. » 6/28/12 12:10pm 6/28/12 12:10pm

The Nuclear Bomb We Lost Off Georgia's Coast In 1958 Is Still Missing

The United States did not have a good year in 1958, especially when it came to transporting nuclear weapons. There was the incident where a nuclear bomb was dropped on a little girl's playhouse. There was the plane carrying a nuclear warhead that caught fire and burned for seven hours, in Morocco. » 5/04/12 6:30pm 5/04/12 6:30pm

Why Did It Take So Long To Invent The Wheel?

To most of us, wheels seem pretty intuitive. You've probably known from an early age, for example, that circular or rounded things roll more easily than boxy or angular things. Knowing this, it's hard to imagine that our earliest ancestors did not come to similar realizations on their own — and yet, the first wheels… » 3/07/12 2:30pm 3/07/12 2:30pm