The Zeppelin Train, The Aerotrain And Other Classic Streamlined Trains

Long before there were bullet trains and high-speed light rail systems, people experimented with creating super-streamlined trains that could whisk people across the country in Googie splendor. In some alternate universe, these streamlined trains of the 1930s, 1940s and 1950s are still in service. » 4/19/14 3:30pm Yesterday 3:30pm

Lockheed's Senior Peg: The Forgotten Stealth Bomber

Perhaps because it was built in secret and designed to be invisible, the stealth bomber is unforgettable the moment you see it. What few remember, though, is that the iconic silhouette almost looked like this. Here's the story of how Senior Peg came to be, why we didn't get it, and why we might want it back. » 3/01/14 6:04pm 3/01/14 6:04pm

Ghana's coffin art lets people bury their loved ones in style

In European cultures, we cremate our dead or bury them in a simple pine box. But coffins are a lot fancier in Ghana, where the Ga people believe that life continues in another world after death, and they want it to carry on in style. Here are some stunning examples of Ghana's famous coffin art. » 1/08/14 7:40am 1/08/14 7:40am

A map of 19th Century shipping routes and nothing else

Nautical trade routes stretch like so many lengths of string in this arresting visualization of intercontinental commerce in the 1800s. The map that emerges highlights not only several continents and their busiest ports, but the various trade winds that cycle through the lower reaches of Earth's atmosphere. » 1/05/14 3:29pm 1/05/14 3:29pm

The Strange and Wonderful History of Diving Suits, From 1715 to Today

Long before we had spacesuits, we had diving suits. The ocean was the first hostile environment that we sent people into, completely covered with protective gear. And the suits that people created with late-18th century or 19th century technology are astonighing to behold. See for yourself! » 9/07/13 11:30am 9/07/13 11:30am

How a pair of torpedos led to the worst shark attack in history

On July 26, 1945, the USS Indianapolis reached the island of Tinian, where it delivered the components and enriched uranium necessary for the atomic bomb Little Boy, which would soon devastate Hiroshima. But it's perhaps best known for its role in history's worst shark attack. » 8/10/13 11:39am 8/10/13 11:39am

Real-Life Flying Saucers Prove That the Truth Is Right Here

We introduced you some of the weirdest aircraft of the 20th century before, but now it's time to talk about Earth's fleets of flying saucers. Check out these vehicles and concepts that show how we've been building UFOs all along. » 6/19/13 7:33pm 6/19/13 7:33pm

A Treasury of Flying Cars, from the Golden Age of Aviation

Every time you get in a traffic jam, you dream of pulling a lever, adding wings to your car, and soaring over the rest of the poor drivers. And then you wonder: Where's my flying car? The truth is, flying cars have existed for decades. You just wouldn't want most of these. » 6/03/13 6:43pm 6/03/13 6:43pm

Who invented the world's very first car?

Who invented the first car? If we're talking about the first modern automobile, then it's Karl Benz in 1886. But long before him, there were strange forerunners to the today's cars, including toys for emperors, steam-powered artillery carriers, and clanking, creaking British buses. » 6/28/11 6:30am 6/28/11 6:30am