Beautiful Ferrari Release Remembers 'Penetration Of Gilles Villeneuve'

Everything that Ferrari does is Italian. Switches in their cars often don't make sense, but it doesn't matter, because it's got passion and other cliches besides. That same line of thinking extends, apparently, to their press releases, the most recent of which remembers an event much differently than everyone else.

I'm speaking, of course, about the 'Penetration of Gilles Villeneuve.'

Don't remember the 'Penetration of Gilles Villeneuve?' It was in 1978, I think. I can really only approximate the date because of subtle hints in the press release that probably cannot be relied upon, and I'm not sure I trust:

Eight years later debuted the Montreal track, built on the side roads of the artificial island of Notre Dame, made with the debris of the excavations for the construction of the Olympic Village in 1976. This time it was to penetrate a Canadian Gilles Villeneuve with the Ferrari 312 T3.

Emphasis mine, obviously. At one point, Ferrari goes on to defeat itself, at which point driver French Rene Arnoux goes through some sort of identity crisis, enters a chrysalis, and re-emerges as a beautiful Italian man:

When in May 1982, Villeneuve lost his life in Zolder, the track took its name and the year after Ferrari returned to defeat us through a great trial of René Arnoux. Two seasons later, he was instead Michele Alboreto to triumph.

At one point, it also refers to the delightful dribble of Jean Alesi. Jean Alesi is French, much like Arnoux, but I don't think that means he has a salivary issue. Also, Michael Schumacher liked to make a bunch of statements back in the day.

If I'm not making any sense, don't worry. This press release doesn't make any sense either. The full text is below:

THE CIRCUS IN THE LAND OF GILLES

Maranello, 2nd June - That Sunday is the 45th Grand Prix of Canada. The race is scheduled appearance for the first time in 1967, when Jack Brabham was imposed on the homonymous car, and in the history was played on three tracks: Mosport Park (8 editions), Mont-Tremblant (2) and Montreal with 34 previous World Cup has become a classic.

The Ferrari in Canada has won eleven occasions (in percentage 25% of the time) with the first success was even a shotgun. It was 1970 and competed in Mont-Tremblant: Jacky Ickx was a triumph, with the 312 B, followed by Clay Regazzoni.

Eight years later debuted the Montreal track, built on the side roads of the artificial island of Notre Dame, made with the debris of the excavations for the construction of the Olympic Village in 1976. This time it was to penetrate a Canadian Gilles Villeneuve with the Ferrari 312 T3. The echo of that success was incredible: it was the first F1 victory of a pilot of the North American country and had arrived just in Quebec, the birthplace of Gilles. When in May 1982, Villeneuve lost his life in Zolder, the track took its name and the year after Ferrari returned to defeat us through a great trial of René Arnoux. Two seasons later, he was instead Michele Alboreto to triumph.

In 1995, the car number 27 in Jean Alesi gave the greatest joy of his career: Michael Schumacher of Benetton, had a broken-down electronics that forced him to the pits for a change of the steering wheel and a reset of the system, and for once Alesi was able to dribble too often the bad luck that had targeted. The French crossed the finish line first by celebrating the best of his 31st birthday. Italians resident in Canada, to celebrate, overran the runway, risking to be invested: Jean was forced to stop to pick up the joy of the fans and let her off the 412 T2. To bring it back to the box wrapped in a French flag was precisely Schumacher.

Just the other are linked to the German six wins Ferrari in Canada, the first of which came in 1997. The following year there was the most discussed, because the Ferrari driver, coming out of the box, Heinz Harald Frentzen frightened that ended with Williams out of the race . To Michael was inflicted a stop & go penalty but even this prevented him from triumph.

One of the characteristics of the track are the walls. And there is one in particular that has seen running into many of the greatest champions of recent years. It is the last corner that leads to the outside at the finish line. The wall, nicknamed the "Wall of Champions" has "collected" the likes of Jacques Villeneuve, Damon Hill, Rubens Barrichello and, more recently, Jenson Button, Nico Rosberg and Sebastian Vettel (Friday 2011). Even Schumacher it was harmless: Michael ended its run there in 1999 while he was in the lead, but was able to win in 2000 and then from 2002 to 2004 becoming the king of the Canadian track with seven statements.

Translations go in the comments.

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