We've all seen the videos — some determined citizen videos himself getting stopped by the cops, asking "am I being detained" eight hundred times, and then getting sent off with a ticket as before. It appears one Australian idiot followed this format and got into a police chase.

The guy behind the cellphone camera this time claims he and his passenger were in a police chase. Nobody in the car seems particularly worried about it.

Lots of police in pursuit of us at the moment....a legal corporation...

No, I have no idea what he means by that last bit either. The driver claims he ran through a breathalyzer checkpoint in just about the most lackadaisical Australian manner possible.

Yeah we just went through a breathalyzer. We refused to stop for a breathalyzer test, so, yeah.

An extremely low-speed police chase ensues, ending with the cops cutting off the driver's van. The cops tell him to open his door. The driver refuses.

This tactic might work for getting stopped for a speeding ticket, or in a questionably-constitutional homeland security checkpoint here in America. It does not work after running from a very legal breathalyzer checkpoint and starting a police chase.

The cops smash his window and arrest him, despite his shouts of "I DO NOT CONSENT."

I, for one, blame the Internet. When everyone was watching TV, our medium of viewing police stops was in shows like Cops. We understood that running from a breathalyzer checkpoint, drawing the cops into a chase, and refusing to open your door makes you look like a dangerous drunk moron. TV gives you some perspective of how insane you look when you scream 'I do not consent' at a cop who is in the process of arresting you.

The first-person view of online traffic stop videos destroys all that sense of perspective, and while they sometimes serve as a kind of viral civil disobedience, the side effect is that they empower probably-drunk yahoos like this who really don't know their rights.

So please, watch these traffic stop videos responsibly, and remember that drunk-driving checkpoints are legal in the interest of public safety, at least here in the US.

UPDATE: It appears that when he shouts out "Freemen on the Land" at 0:56 in the video, he's referencing a philosophical belief that he, himself, is a sovereign state. Wikipedia details it pretty well, as does reader bobrayner. It's clear that this guy is more than just an Internet-influenced wacko, but a political theory-influenced wacko as well.