The Ford Model T changed the world in immeasurable ways. Just for starters, it spawned a mobile society and the construction of a vast network of roads. But how the heck do you drive it?

It's easy to think cars have always worked like modern cars do. After all, the basic control scheme became commonplace sometime in the 1930s and admitting some variation through the years, hasn't deviated too much. The Model T certainly has four wheels and a steering wheel, but there's no foot accelerator, no shift knob, no oil dipstick and something an exceedingly few people these days have ever even heard of called a "spark advance," something done by computer now, but which was manually controlled back in the day. Ed Hebb, a volunteer at the Henry Ford Estate in Dearborn takes us for a walk around a Model T and explains how everything works. It makes the convenience of turning a key and hitting the gas something to appreciate.