Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Russia's built themselves an electric supercar. Seriously. We might even be willing to be caught alive in this modular Russian beauty. Look out Tesla and Fisker, because in mother Russia, borscht may beat you.

Marussia: Russia's First Electric Supercar

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS

Marussia: Russia's First Electric SupercarS


We thought the Lada Revolution 3 from last years Paris Motor Show was the tops in Russian supercars, but the Marussia completely crushes that notion with a supercar we'd be caught alive in.

According to Russia Today, the Marussia is the brainchild of ADD-addled Nikolay Fomenko, who's got his fingers in everything from racing to theatrical acting. The Marussia starts with a tube-frame chassis onto which composite body panels are attached. The modular nature of the body means changes can be made easily to tweak the look of the car. That modular nature carries over in the engine bay, where the car will initially launch with a 240 to 300 HP version of the Nissan VQ V6.

However, they are working on an all-electric version set for unveil sometime in the middle of this year which would debut a nanotech battery sourced from a mysterious "Russian construction bureau." This EV version of the Marussia would ticket for around $100k and run for a claimed 248 miles on a single charge and even work in Russia's frigid climate. Some bold claims to be sure. Even if an electric version never comes, and the gas motor version doesn't exactly have barn-burning power numbers, it does look pretty cool, and with bargain pricing it might be a perfect option for all of those Russian oligarchs which find themselves only stinking rich, instead of filthy rich these days. [EnglishRussia, RussiaToday]