Two European Automakers Meet Decade's "Voluntary" CO2 Targets; Success!

Only two companies achieved the voluntary average CO2 target of 140 g/km that European automakers set for themselves in the late 1990's to avoid actual government sanctions. Fiat and Mini were the big winners with emissions of 138.2 and 139.6 g/km, respectively. The worst offenders were Porsche (275.6 g/km), Land Rover (249.2 g/km) and Jeep (218.7 g/km).

The figures were published by Clean Green Cars, which also pointed out that "Every manufacturer with average new car emissions significantly above 200 g/km of CO2 saw sales slump from January to June." Clearly, voluntary agreements are working. Why oh why then did the EU have to implement non-voluntary emissions targets for 2012? Press release below the jump.

Fiat tops the CO2 league; Porsche is rock bottom

Figures published exclusively by Clean Green Cars today reveal that Fiat and MINI are only mainstream manufacturers whose average tailpipe CO2 is now under 140 g/km. That figure was the target car makers' set themselves a decade ago in their voluntary agreement. Data for 2008 shows how far they have fallen short.

"Some manufacturers have delivered on their promise, but the vast majority have to raise their game significantly," said Jay Nagley of Clean Green Cars. "Porsche has the most work to do: bottom of the league, with CO2 emissions that actually went up slightly in the first half of 2008.

"What is interesting is that, as fuel prices rocket and the new car market falters, car makers with the highest emissions are being punished by the consumer. They have been complaining about pressure from the EU to meet what they say are 'unrealistic' targets. Now they are having to face much stiffer targets from the people that really matter: consumers."

Every manufacturer with average new car emissions significantly above 200 g/km of CO2 saw sales slump from January to June. Even bigger drops were reported last month by the five with the worst average CO2 output.

Porsche and Jeep sales were down by more than a half, Land Rover and Chrysler fell by nearly 30% while Subaru registrations plummeted 17.8%. As the total market only fell by 6.1%, there is clear evidence that high-CO2 cars are being heavily penalised.

[Source: Newspress/Clean Green Cars]