Ford To Save Environment By Using Magical Fruit In Seats Of 2008 Mustang

You've really got to love Ford for giving the environmental messaging the old college try — they've put out yet another press release touting the magical petroleum-reducing soybean-based foam in their seats. This time, it's not just that they've invented a new way to make seat foam out of the fruit that makes you toot. Nope, this release is all about promoting the first vehicle they'll be offering the new seat foam in — the 2008 Ford Mustang. While we could go with more easy jokes about putting your foot down on the gas as your seat passes gas, we've got something more important to ask. Namely, why Ford has yet to learn using soy-foam as an argument for your car company significantly reducing CO2 emissions and dependence on Middle East oil — doesn't so much pass the smell test. Full press release after the jump.

FORD, LEAR TO LAUNCH INDUSTRY'S FIRST SOY BASED SEAT FOAM IN 2008 FORD MUSTANG

* Ford Motor Company and Lear Corporation have joined forces to produce seat foam made from soy-based materials. The first application will appear in the 2008 Ford Mustang.

* Ford has a rich history in incorporating soy-based materials into its products that dates back to the Model T. Ford's industry-leading work with soy-foams was showcased in its award-winning Model U concept, which featured soy-based seat cushions and soy-based resin composite tailgate.

* Environmental advantages of soy-foam include; a reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions compared to the current petroleum-based material, lower energy to produce, up to 24 percent renewable content, and a reduction of dependency on volatile energy markets.

DEARBORN, Mich., July 12 - Ford Motor Company [NYSE:F] and Lear Corporation [NYSE: LEA] will mark an automotive milestone in August when production of soy-based foam for seats begins in the 2008 model year Ford Mustang.

America's beloved pony car will use the industry's first soy-based flexible foam in the seat backs and seat cushions beginning in August at the Auto Alliance International factory in Flat Rock, Michigan, home of the Ford Mustang.

Ford has a rich history in incorporating soy based materials into its products. The Model T, for example, once contained 60 pounds of soybeans in its paint and molded plastic parts. Ford again showcased its industry-leading work with soy-foams in 2003 on the Model U concept, which featured soy-based seat cushions as well as a soy-based resin composite tailgate.

"Our technical team had to overcome several significant hurdles to bring this environmentally responsible technology to production," said Gerhard Schmidt, vice president of Research & Advanced Engineering at Ford Motor Company. "We are pleased that our diligent efforts in developing this technology have resulted in the production of soy-foam for the Ford Mustang."

Ford was the first automaker in the world to demonstrate that soy-based polyols could be used at high percentage levels to make foam capable of meeting or exceeding automotive requirements. In 2004, Ford and Lear formed a partnership to commercialize soy-foam applications, with initial work concentrating on the molding of headrest and armrest components.

Lear is a leader in the area of environmental systems for automotive seating with industry firsts, such as the use of expanded polypropylene and polyethylene materials. These materials are used in place of traditional polyurethane foam which offers lower mass and is 100 percent recyclable.

"Using renewable resources is an important means to supplying automotive products that improve environmental impact," said Ray Scott, senior vice president and president of Lear's Seating Systems Division. "This also helps in reducing the amount of pollution in the production of materials for automotive use. Ford Motor Company and Lear Corporation are able to bring this product to market ahead of our competitors due largely to our collaborative work with in the area of 'Green' technology."

The environmental advantages of soy-foam include: a reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions when compared to current petroleum-based material, lower energy required to produce the material, up to 24 percent renewable content, and a reduction of dependence on volatile energy markets.

Ford and Lear collaborated with the United Soybean Board - New Uses Committee (a group of 64 farmers and agriculture industry leaders), Urethane Soy Systems Company, Bayer Corporation and Renosol Corporation on soy-foam development.

Friendlier to the Environment

"Soy is a very green, renewable resource," says Debbie Mielewsk, technical leader for Ford's Materials Research & Advanced Engineering Department. "Using soy-based foam gives us the opportunity to conserve natural resources and reduce our environmental footprint."

Most automotive manufacturers today use 100 percent petroleum-based polyol foam. Each vehicle produced today contains an average of 30 pounds of petroleum-based foam. The total annual worldwide market for the foam is 9 billion pounds. Milewski says auto manufacturers research and development of renewable, more environmentally friendly materials to produce the foam, could have a significant environmental impact.

About Ford Motor Company

Ford Motor Company, a global automotive industry leader based in Dearborn, Mich., manufactures or distributes automobiles in 200 markets across six continents. With about 260,000 employees and about 100 plants worldwide, the company's core and affiliated automotive brands include Ford, Jaguar, Land Rover, Lincoln , Mercury, Volvo and Mazda. The company provides financial services through Ford Motor Credit Company. For more information regarding Ford's products, please visit www.fordvehicles.com.

About Lear Corporation

Lear Corporation is one of the world's largest suppliers of automotive seating systems, electronic products and electrical distribution systems. Lear's world-class products are designed, engineered and manufactured by a diverse team of more than 90,000 employees at 236 facilities in 33 countries. Lear's headquarters are in Southfield , Michigan . Lear is traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol [LEA]. Further information about Lear is available on the Internet at http://www.lear.com.

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A Staggeringly Underwhelming Press Release On Ford's New Seat Technology