1978 Jaguar XJ-6

Normally, a 70s Jaguar XJ-6 doesn't really grab my attention, but you don't often see a total hideous beater Jag parked on the street. The reason for this is pretty obvious- most Malaise Era Jags didn't last long enough to become beaters.

1978 Jaguar XJ-6

Missing and/or cracked lenses really add to that "just don't care" image. Oh yeah! It really doesn't matter whether the lenses are there or not, since The Prince of Darkness will ensure that no light on the car works more than 10% of the time.

1978 Jaguar XJ-6

This saloon actually looks mean; we can only hope it has a massive exhaust leak to give it the sound to match. Give it some Mad Max steel-spoke rims, a coat of thick black Rustoleum, and a small-block and you'd really have something.

1978 Jaguar XJ-6

I'm pretty sure the cat-face-beneath-clear-plastic hood ornament isn't supposed to be so blurry.

1978 Jaguar XJ-6

This is actually a pretty good-looking design, which is the bait that lured so many unfortunate buyers into British Leyland's trap back in the 70s. Wait, doesn't Hyundai make a snout like this now?

1978 Jaguar XJ-6

This car brings to mind some puzzling questions. Has it always run well enough to keep limping along for 30 years, thus acquiring its beaterness in the honorable gradual-decay manner of so many evil-looking Detroit land yachts of the era? Did a crazy person with bottomless cash reserves pay to keep it running for 27 years, before giving up and selling it to some car-abusing ne'er-do-well? Was it stored for decades and miraculously brought back to life? There's really no way to know.

1978 Jaguar XJ-6

But we do know the gas gauge doesn't work! Uh, it's not any safer to keep the full gas can in the trunk (which is doubtless full of sparking lose wires), but you can't smell it quite as much from the driver's seat that way (especially given that the odds of even one power window working approach zero).

Related:
British Leyland 1977: England's Dreaming! [internal]