China's Zeta Cake: Buick Park AvenueS

Just as GM put the breaks on its coming wave of rear-drive models born of its Holden division in Australia, Buick China is launching its latest feast for the east at the Shanghai auto show. It's the Park Avenue, a new model derived — like the Pontiac G8 — on the Holden-developed Zeta platform. In content, the Park Avenue is a China-built version of the Holden Statesman, powered by Aussie 2.8-liter and 3.6-liter V6 engines, exported from Fishermans Bend, Victoria. (Not to be confused with Fisherman's Friend, Maine.) Buick's success in China is another testament to the widening belief that the Chinese and US car markets are similar to the point of interchangeable. That is, we both like big, rear-drive cars and both like Chinese food.

Press Release:

hanghai General Motors (Shanghai GM) has introduced the newest member of its Buick lineup, the Park Avenue luxury sedan.

Like the affluent New York City boulevard of the same name, Buick's Park Avenue is trendy and luxurious. With its range of advanced technologies and high-grade amenities, not to mention a stylish design that conveys a sense of power and passion, it is representative of traditional American luxury sedans.

"The Park Avenue is the perfect blend of tranquility and power," said Shanghai GM President Ding Lei. "It shows Buick's ability to move with the times while continuing to leverage GM's global resources and our local knowledge. Designed especially for business leaders and other elites, it is a component of our effort to maintain our leadership position in China by addressing the needs of all of our customers."

The Park Avenue is based on GM's new global rear-wheel-drive architecture to ensure a premium driving experience. At 5,175 mm in length, 1,899 mm in width and 1,480 mm in height, and with an impressive 3,009-mm wheelbase, the Park Avenue also offers a highly spacious ride.

The Park Avenue 's genuine leather seats are designed to accommodate people of varying sizes with 8-way power adjustment for the front seats. All seats incorporate a massage function. A high-quality entertainment system with LCD panels and an advanced heating, ventilation and air conditioning system offer the relaxation and comfort that one would expect of a luxury sedan. The Park Avenue 's GPS navigation system contains road information for more than 300 cities in China . The Bluetooth mobile phone system is also available.

Like all Buick products, the Park Avenue offers a high level of safety and peace of mind. It is equipped with the GM Local Area Network (GM-LAN) high-speed communication system, which is based on the top-of-the-line 32-bit 500 kb/second engine control system. W ith a signal transmission speed approaching real-time, information flow from various sensors is instantaneous, enhancing efficiency and safety. Further enhancing safety are six intelligent air bags for the driver and passengers.

The Park Avenue is powered by GM's smooth yet powerful AlloyTec V-6 engine, which accelerates from 0 to 100 km/h in 7.8 seconds. The engine control unit features the latest Bosch E77 32-bit ECM processor. With the Remote Engine Start (RES) function, the driver can start the engine up to 20 minutes in advance within 60 meters distance. The RES function also can adjust the temperature inside the car.

Customers have a choice of two engine displacements. The Park Avenue 's 3.6-liter engine generates maximum output of 187kW (250 hp) @ 6,500 rpm and maximum torque of 340 Nm @ 3,200 rpm. Its 2.8-liter engine offers maximum output of 150 kW (201 hp) @ 6,000 rpm and maximum torque of 265 Nm @ 3,000 rpm.

Shanghai GM is offering five Park Avenue variants: the 3.6-liter Flagship, which is priced at RMB 498,800; the 3.6-liter Elite, which is priced at RMB 388,800; the 2.8-liter Luxury, which is priced at RMB 458,800; the 2.8-liter Elite, which is priced at RMB 368,800; and the 2.8-liter Comfort, which is priced at RMB 328,800.

Related:
Shanghai Auto Show Preview: GM Goes To China, Brings Chevy And Buick Concepts With Them; Broken: Buick Just Sold More Cars in China than in the United States of America [internal]