For $11,500, It’s A Datshonda!

Putting a modern engine in an older car can either time-warp its performance, or point out the glaring faults of its remaining antiquated architecture. Today's Nice Price or Crack Pipe Datsun 510 has received Honda's peaky F20C as its motivator, but should its price be even higher than its rev limit?

Speaking of high, apparently you'd have to be to spend seventy-large on yesterday's pimped-out Jeep, which at an overwhelming 95% Crack Pipe loss, seemed to only appeal to the studded dog collar and pierced genitalia crowd. Sadly for the seller, those freaks never have anywhere near that kind of cash.

Muy cheaper, and a lot less small-dick implying, is this four-door 510 rocking an F20C out of a Honda S2000. Now, that may seem like the unholy mating of Aerosmith and Run DMC, but it's not as crazy as it might seem. On the other hand, the S2000 digital IP implanted in the 510's dash like it's a ghetto teletubby is pretty weird.

For $11,500, It’s A Datshonda!

Also on the strange side of things is the fact that the builder of this fast five and dime has shaved off the rear door handles in an attempt to make it appear a two-door. That's a common practice among manufacturers seeking to make their four-door only models look a little less like family haulers (see Nissan Pathfinder) but in this case it makes you wonder why they just didn't start with one of the thousands of 2-door 510s out there?

The F20C is gay for the revs, and keeping one in its power band is like fapping in front of nuns, you really have to work at it. Still, while you're waiting for that VTEC to kick in - yo, you you can reflect on this 2.0 litre's 240-bhp and mean piston speed of 25 m/s - both record-setting. You might also contemplate the builder's choice of 280ZX disc brakes, rack and pinion steering conversion, and 4.11 limited slip rearend to help - respectively - the stopping, turning, and not sharting the pumpkin all over the street. You'll have to think fast however as backing the F20C is Honda's close-ratio 6-speed which means your right hand won't be getting much down time.

For $11,500, It’s A Datshonda!

Inside, there's the aforementioned digital dash along with bucket seats out of yet another manufacturer's product - a Toyota MR2. And then, like a hairy-assed cherry on top of this Japanese maker melange of a car, there's a Grant GT steering wheel daring you to deride it for its Pep Boys provenance.

Outside, the car has two-tone paint and at least as many different styles of alloy wheel, according to the pictures. The grille is missing, and the front bumper at least has a patina of rust that probably should be addressed. In its favor, the seller says it currently sports collector car plates making annual tagging unnecessary. Of course should you not live in Washington State, YMMV. The seller doesn't say what the mileage is, but with so many cars living under its one roof, I wouldn't know whether to take an aggregate or just add them all up.

For $11,500, It’s A Datshonda!

The S2000 was a epochal car for Honda, being both their first rear-driver in decades and one of the past decade's most uncompromising sports cars. It also had an exhaust note that was like an angry hive of coke-addled bees. Datsun's 510, on the other hand was offered by the company at the outset of their establishment as a maker of sporting cars. Add to that Pete Brock immortalizing the 510 as a BRE team stalwart and it's no surprise that the ignominious three box sedans are still coveted today. By bringing past perfect and present tense together in one mean machine, the builder of this Honda-powered Datsun has created a compelling chimera. The question of course, is whether it is $11,500 worth of compulsion.

So, what do you think, is this F20C flavored 510 worthy of an $11,500 bank account extraction? Or, would it only be a keeper if it was lots cheaper?

You decide!

Seattle Craigslist or go here if the ad disappears.

H/T to Pat for the hookup!

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