We remember this clip vividly. Given the date, we were a mere nine years old at the time, and our dad come down the hall to excitedly to pull us away from our obsessive Lego habit to come watch, saying "Lamborghini's gonna be on 60 Minutes!. Along with the '77 Trans Am, the '69 Dodge Charger and the 308 GTS, the Lamborghini Countach had captured our pre-pre-pubescent heart. In fact, it was our absolute favorite car in the world. When the F40 arrived a couple of years later, we weren't exactly "Pffft," but it still wasn't a Countach. Of course, the Vader-Lambo was most-certainly the longest-running completely-outrageous car ever built. Argue the longevity? We'll argue the outrageous. Argue the outrageous, we'll fight you on the length of production. You can't win, Darth.

And as we were wont to do over the various merits and demerits of action figures, we often nearly came to blows defending its supremacy against infidel friends and relatives who were also still more than a half-decade from holding a driver's license. We had multiple posters of it hung lovingly with staples on our bedroom wall. And when the Diablo arrived, we were let down. The Countach? It's the '32 Ford wearing its hot-rod guise. It's a Bugatti Atlantic. It's a '63 Split-Window 'Vette. It's a ridiculous, preposterous, entirely impractical car that nobody's ever quite had enough of. And it speaks of the state of the auto industry that there hasn't been a vehicle since that has ever stirred us quite so much. [Thanks to F.P. for the tip.]

Related:
One Hundred Thousand in Car on the Wall: Lamborghini as Art [Internal]