Well, sorta. Even though Mazda's CEO said they could totally quit the rotary any time, like a true junkie, they keep coming back to get their sweet, sweet pistonless fix any way they can. And this time they snuck it into the trunk of a prototype Mazda 2.

The Mazda 2 in question is the prototype Mazda 2 EV with a built-in range extender, in the form of a 330cc, 26 HP rotary engine that runs at a constant 2000 RPM. The engine is mounted flat under the cargo area floor, along with a 2.6 gallon fuel tank.

Advertisement

I'd suppose that keeping it at a constant RPM helps curb the rotary's notorious fuel thirst, and the engine does manage to about double the 124-mile driving range of the electric Mazda 2.

Plus, as James Garner will tell you below, rotaries are very smooth-running engines, buttery, even. That smoothness is a big plus for a range extending engine, since the drivers will be used to the smoothness of the electric drivetrain, and the smoother the transition from batteries to combustion power, the better.

Sponsored

It's not a new RX-7, but it's nice to see the Wankel still alive and kicking outside of a seatbelt tensioner.

(Thanks, Chuckanut)